Wind turbines hazardous to birds, bats

Nov 13, 2007

Wind energy, a fast-growing sector of the U.S. energy industry, is taking a toll on nocturnal wildlife caught in the turbines, officials said.

Songbirds until recently were the most frequently reported fatalities at U.S. utility-scale wind facilities, The Journal of Wildlife Management reported in a news release. Another study showed 78 percent of carcasses found at wind-energy facilities outside of California were songbirds, about half nocturnal, protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Recent monitoring studies indicate that energy utility-scale, wind facilities killed more bats than were expected based on earlier studies, reported the Journal, published by The Wildlife Society in Bethesda, Md. Reports indicate large numbers of bats have been killed at facilities along forested ridge tops in the eastern United States.

States are inconsistent on surveying the effects of turbines have on local environments, researchers said.

Researchers recommended several methods to study impacts of wind-energy facility on nocturnal birds and bats, including moon-watching, tracking radar, audio microphones for birds and ultrasound microphones for bats.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Designing future cities

Oct 08, 2014

A hundred years ago, one out of every five people lived in urban areas. By 2050, that number will balloon to over four out of five.

NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye

Sep 30, 2014

NASA and NOAA scientists participating in NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) mission used their expert skills, combined with a bit of serendipity on Sept. 17, 2014, to guide the remotely piloted ...

NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters

Sep 18, 2014

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite and Aqua satellite gathered data on Hurricane Edouard's rainfall, clouds and waning power is it continued moving northward in the Atlantic into ...

Recommended for you

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

Oct 21, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

Oct 21, 2014

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

Oct 21, 2014

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

genesgalore
not rated yet Nov 13, 2007
seems like there ought to be a high frequency wave that would repel bird or bat.
bobwinners
1 / 5 (1) Nov 13, 2007
It has occured to me again, and again, that nothing mankind does to make his life easier, safer and more comfortable is in agreement with nature. Perhaps the best solution is to remove 90% of the human population from the face of the earth. I'm sure that this would significantly reduce our depradation of the earth's environ.