Wind turbines hazardous to birds, bats

Nov 13, 2007

Wind energy, a fast-growing sector of the U.S. energy industry, is taking a toll on nocturnal wildlife caught in the turbines, officials said.

Songbirds until recently were the most frequently reported fatalities at U.S. utility-scale wind facilities, The Journal of Wildlife Management reported in a news release. Another study showed 78 percent of carcasses found at wind-energy facilities outside of California were songbirds, about half nocturnal, protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Recent monitoring studies indicate that energy utility-scale, wind facilities killed more bats than were expected based on earlier studies, reported the Journal, published by The Wildlife Society in Bethesda, Md. Reports indicate large numbers of bats have been killed at facilities along forested ridge tops in the eastern United States.

States are inconsistent on surveying the effects of turbines have on local environments, researchers said.

Researchers recommended several methods to study impacts of wind-energy facility on nocturnal birds and bats, including moon-watching, tracking radar, audio microphones for birds and ultrasound microphones for bats.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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genesgalore
not rated yet Nov 13, 2007
seems like there ought to be a high frequency wave that would repel bird or bat.
bobwinners
1 / 5 (1) Nov 13, 2007
It has occured to me again, and again, that nothing mankind does to make his life easier, safer and more comfortable is in agreement with nature. Perhaps the best solution is to remove 90% of the human population from the face of the earth. I'm sure that this would significantly reduce our depradation of the earth's environ.

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