Congressional Hearing on Asteroid Threat

Nov 07, 2007

UC Davis physics professor J. Anthony Tyson will testify before Congress on Thursday, Nov. 8, on near-Earth asteroids. Tyson will talk about the potential role of the proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in surveying the sky for objects that might eventually strike our planet. The hearing of the House Committee on Science and Technology will begin at 10 a.m. in room 2318 of the Rayburn Office Building.

Tyson is director of the LSST project. The LSST is a proposed ground-based, 8.4-meter telescope that will provide digital imaging of faint astronomical objects, covering the available sky every three nights. It will map the mysterious "dark matter" thought to make up much of the universe by looking for distortions of light from distant galaxies.

It will also open a window on objects that change or move on rapid timescales such as potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroids, exploding supernovae and comets. Construction cost for the telescope, which would be located on a mountaintop in northern Chile, is estimated at about $389 million.

The hearing will examine the status of NASA's Near-Earth Object survey program, review the findings and recommendations of NASA's report to Congress, Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Analysis of Alternatives, and assess NASA's plans for complying with the requirements of Section 321 of the NASA Authorization Act of 2005.

Others scheduled to testify include Rep. Luis Fortuno, R-Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico resident commissioner; James Green, director of the Planetary Science Division, NASA; Scott Pace, NASA associate administrator; Donald K. Yeomans, manager of the Near Earth Object Program Office, Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Professor Donald B. Campbell, Cornell University; and Russell L. Schweickart, chairman of the B612 Foundation.

Source: UC Davis

Explore further: The source of the sky's X-ray glow

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Google made failed bid for Spotify

1 hour ago

Internet titan Google tried last year to buy streaming music service Spotify but backed off for reasons including a whopping price tag, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.

Thieves got into 1K StubHub accounts

2 hours ago

(AP)—Cyber thieves got into more than 1,000 StubHub customers' accounts and fraudulently bought tickets for events through the online ticket reseller, a law enforcement official and the company said Tuesday.

Microsoft CEO sees 'bold' plan as 4Q tops Street

2 hours ago

(AP)—Microsoft Corp. CEO Satya Nadella painted an upbeat vision of the future Tuesday, saying that the next version of Windows will be unified across screens of all sizes and that two money-losing units—Nokia ...

Recommended for you

Titan offers clues to atmospheres of hazy planets

7 hours ago

When hazy planets pass across the face of their star, a curious thing happens. Astronomers are not able to see any changes in the range of light coming from the star and planet system.

Having fun with the equation of time

7 hours ago

If you're like us, you might've looked at a globe of the Earth in elementary school long before the days of Google Earth and wondered just what that strange looking figure eight thing on its side was.

The source of the sky's X-ray glow

Jul 27, 2014

In findings that help astrophysicists understand our corner of the galaxy, an international research team has shown that the soft X-ray glow blanketing the sky comes from both inside and outside the solar system.

User comments : 0