Astronauts enter new module for first time

Oct 27, 2007
Astronauts enter new module for first time
STS-120 and Expedition 16 crew members gather in the new Harmony module to talk to the press. Image credit: NASA TV

The STS-120 and Expedition 16 crews entered the Harmony module for the first time at 8:24 a.m EDT after Mission Specialist Paolo Nespoli and Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson opened the hatches.

Harmony will provide the docking ports for new research laboratories from the European Space Agency and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The laboratories will be delivered to the station on upcoming shuttle missions.

Members of the shuttle and station crews gathered in the new Harmonony module shortly after 2 p.m to discuss the mission in interviews with CBS News, FOX News, and WHAM-TV of Rochester, New York.

The participants were Whitson, Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko, and STS-120 Commander Pam Melroy, Pilot George Zamka, and mission specialists Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock and Clay Anderson.

The crews are also preparing for Sunday’s spacewalk, the second of the mission. The spacewalk will be conducted by Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski and Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Daniel Tani. To prepare, they will do an overnight “campout” in the station’s airlock.

Source: NASA

Explore further: NASA's IceCube no longer on ice

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The source of the sky's X-ray glow

23 hours ago

In findings that help astrophysicists understand our corner of the galaxy, an international research team has shown that the soft X-ray glow blanketing the sky comes from both inside and outside the solar system.

Recommended for you

NASA's IceCube no longer on ice

36 minutes ago

NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) has chosen a team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, to build its first Earth science-related CubeSat mission.

Tidal forces gave moon its shape, according to new analysis

14 hours ago

The shape of the moon deviates from a simple sphere in ways that scientists have struggled to explain. A new study by researchers at UC Santa Cruz shows that most of the moon's overall shape can be explained by taking into ...

User comments : 0