Space shuttle mission Web coverage offered

Oct 18, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said it will provide a TV webcast and podcasts of the STS-120 mission to the International Space Station.

Space shuttle Discovery and the STS-120 crew are scheduled to lift off Tuesday from the Kennedy Space Center at 11:38 a.m. EDT

A live webcast featuring STS-112 astronaut Sandra Magnus will start the in-depth coverage of the mission at 11:30 a.m. Monday, NASA said.

The U.S. space agency said a blog will update the countdown beginning about six hours before Discovery's launch. NASA called the blog, originating from the space center, "The definitive Internet source for pre-launch information."

During the 14-day mission, Discovery's seven astronauts will add a module called Harmony to the International Space Station. The Italian-built segment will become a connecting point for future laboratories built by the European and Japanese space agencies.

As Discovery's flight concludes, a blog will detail the spacecraft's return to Earth, NASA said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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