Firm out of NASA shuttle replacement plan

Sep 16, 2007

An Oklahoma company's development of a commercial U.S. spacecraft sustained a setback when NASA decided to quit financing the company's project.

Termination of the agreement between NASA and Rocketplane Kistler leaves California's SpaceX as the only company in the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services competition to privately develop a reusable space ship to eventually replace the space shuttle, Florida Daily said Saturday.

The newspaper said NASA has about $175 million earmarked for Rocketplane and likely will reallocate it to other programs.

Rocketplane had no immediate comment, but has 30 days to appeal the termination.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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