EPA issues list of high volume chemicals

Sep 10, 2007

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released the first list Monday of high production volume chemicals and their hazards.

The "Hazard Characterizations on 101 High Production Volume Chemicals" is based on the EPA's scientific review of toxicity data submitted by U.S. chemical companies.

The list is the result of the EPA's "HPV Challenge Program," which challenged chemical companies to provide the public with basic health and safety data on chemicals that are manufactured in excess of 1 million pounds a year.

The hazard characterizations include a summary of the data submitted, EPA's evaluation of the quality and completeness of the data and an assessment of the potential hazards a chemical or chemical category might pose.

EPA officials said they would combine the data with human and environmental exposure information to determine if additional action is needed to ensure the safety of the chemicals' manufacture and use.

The agency said it plans to assess risks and identify and take needed action on 3,000 HPV chemicals by 2012.

The set of hazard characterizations issued Monday is available at
iaspub.epa.gov/oppthpv/hpv_hc_characterization.get_report>

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Obama says 'no greater threat to planet than climate change'

Related Stories

Taiwan factory workers win $18 mn over cancer deaths

9 hours ago

Workers from a factory in Taiwan which leeched toxic chemicals they say resulted in 200 deaths from cancer and more than 1,000 other cases of the disease won a Tw$564.45 million ($18 million) payout from US electronics company ...

Recommended for you

China's struggle for water security

12 hours ago

Way back in 1999, before he became China's prime minister, Wen Jiabao warned that water scarcity posed one of the greatest threats to the "survival of the nation".

Canada revises upward CO2 emission data since 1990

12 hours ago

Canada revised its greenhouse gas emission data from 1990 to 2013 in a report Friday, showing it had higher carbon dioxide discharges each year, and a doubling of emissions from its oil sands.

Climate censorship gains steam in red states

Apr 17, 2015

While plenty of people found humor in the recent news that officials in Florida and Wisconsin are censoring state workers' ability to talk about, much less work on, climate change, other states are not necessarily laughing. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.