EPA issues list of high volume chemicals

Sep 10, 2007

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released the first list Monday of high production volume chemicals and their hazards.

The "Hazard Characterizations on 101 High Production Volume Chemicals" is based on the EPA's scientific review of toxicity data submitted by U.S. chemical companies.

The list is the result of the EPA's "HPV Challenge Program," which challenged chemical companies to provide the public with basic health and safety data on chemicals that are manufactured in excess of 1 million pounds a year.

The hazard characterizations include a summary of the data submitted, EPA's evaluation of the quality and completeness of the data and an assessment of the potential hazards a chemical or chemical category might pose.

EPA officials said they would combine the data with human and environmental exposure information to determine if additional action is needed to ensure the safety of the chemicals' manufacture and use.

The agency said it plans to assess risks and identify and take needed action on 3,000 HPV chemicals by 2012.

The set of hazard characterizations issued Monday is available at
iaspub.epa.gov/oppthpv/hpv_hc_… erization.get_report

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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