NASA seeks moon life and work images

Aug 23, 2007

NASA has launched a competition that invites university art and design students to create art representative of living and working on the moon.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said its goal is to have students in arts, science and engineering fields collaboratively engage in NASA's mission to return humans to the moon by 2020.

The Advanced Planning and Partnership Office at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., is sponsoring the "Life and Work on the Moon" competition. Winners will receive cash prizes of up to $1,000 and winning artwork will be exhibited online.

Entries, NASA said, will be judged on artistic qualities and whether they depict a valid scenario in the context of the lunar environment.

Winners will also be offered the opportunity to exhibit their work in NASA facilities and science museums.

Entries must be submitted by Dec. 1, with competition winners announced in February. A high school version of the competition is planned for next spring.

Additional information is available at
artcontest.larc.nasa.gov.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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