ISS component sets a record

Aug 14, 2007

Zarya, the International Space Station's first component, completed its 50,000th orbit Tuesday at 11:17 a.m. EDT.

Zarya was funded by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and built by Russia. It was launched Nov. 20, 1998, atop a Proton rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The module is 41.2 feet long and 13.5 feet wide and was designed to have a lifespan of at least 15 years. It initially provided orientation control, communications and electrical power, but now is used primarily for its storage capacity and its 16 external fuel tanks that can hold more than 6 tons of propellant, NASA controllers in Houston said.

Zarya, when translated into English, means "sunrise."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Comet Siding Spring whizzes past Mars

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Image: Alexander Gerst conducts spacewalk

Oct 08, 2014

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst spent six hours and 13 minutes outside the International Space Station with NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman on Tuesday, 7 October 2014. This was the first spacewalk for both astronauts ...

NASA, partners target megacities carbon emissions

Sep 24, 2014

Driving down busy Interstate 5 in Los Angeles in a nondescript blue Toyota Prius, Riley Duren of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is a man on a mission as he surveys the vast urban ...

Recommended for you

Hot explosions on the cool sun

3 hours ago

(Phys.org) —The Sun is more spirited than previously thought. Apart from the solar eruptions, huge bursts of particles and radiation from the outer atmosphere of our star, also the cooler layer right below ...

Europe secures new generation of weather satellites

3 hours ago

Contracts were signed today to build three pairs of MetOp Second Generation satellites, ensuring the continuity of essential information for global weather forecasting and climate monitoring for decades to ...

Comet Siding Spring whizzes past Mars (Update)

16 hours ago

A comet the size of a small mountain and about as solid as a pile of talcum powder whizzed past Mars on Sunday, dazzling space enthusiasts with the once-in-a-million-years encounter.

User comments : 0