Disposition affects how failure is felt

Feb 04, 2006

Failure by a person with a generally gloomy outlook is a bigger setback than failure by someone with a sunnier disposition, say U.S. researchers.

Margaret Marshall of Seattle Pacific University and Jonathon Brown of the University of Washington in Seattle asked more than 80 college students to practice a word-association puzzle on a computer.

The students were then asked how well they expected to perform on a second set of similar puzzles.

Students who expected to do badly felt worse when they did badly, while students who thought they would do OK didn't feel so bad about the failure, the researchers told Nature News.

The study was published in Cognition and Emotion.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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