New metal alloys boost high-temperature heat treatment of jet engine components

Jul 24, 2007

Measurement scientists at the National Physical Laboratory have reduced the uncertainty of thermocouple temperature sensors at high temperatures to within a degree. This may allow manufacturers to improve efficiency and reduce wastage in the quest for more efficient jet engines and lower aircraft emissions.

Aircraft engines are more efficient at higher temperatures, but this requires thermal treatment of engine components at very specific high temperatures in excess of 1300 °C. If the heat treatment temperature deviates too much from the optimal temperature, the treatment may be inadequate.

Thermocouples are calibrated using materials with known melting points (fixed points), but the available reference materials in the region of the very high temperatures required to treat jet engine components have a large uncertainty compared with the lower temperature fixed points.

Using a new type of metal alloy, NPL scientists have identified a range of reference points for thermocouples beyond 1100 °C. With this added confidence in thermal sensors, component manufacturers are expected to start improving hotter thermal treatments and reducing wastage during production of parts for engines which can run at higher temperatures.

Source: National Physical Laboratory

Explore further: New research predicts when, how materials will act

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cattle damage to riverbanks can be undone

Feb 19, 2015

Simply removing cattle may be all that is required to restore many degraded riverside areas in the American West, although this can vary and is dependent on local conditions. These are the findings of Jonathan ...

Calorie-burning vest makes use of cold exposure

Feb 12, 2015

"Give fat the cold shoulder." That is the catchy advice in a video of a scientist who believes he is on to something to support weight loss, and that is The Cold Shoulder calorie-burning vest. Dr. Wayne B. ...

Recommended for you

New research signals big future for quantum radar

11 hours ago

A prototype quantum radar that has the potential to detect objects which are invisible to conventional systems has been developed by an international research team led by a quantum information scientist at the University ...

Top-precision optical atomic clock starts ticking

14 hours ago

A state-of-the-art optical atomic clock, collaboratively developed by scientists from the University of Warsaw, Jagiellonian University, and Nicolaus Copernicus University, is now "ticking away" at the National ...

The building blocks of the future defy logic

18 hours ago

Wake up in the morning and stretch; your midsection narrows. Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume that when a force is applied along an ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.