Endeavour Rolls To Pad Tonight

Jul 10, 2007
Endeavour Rolls To Pad Tonight
The payload canister is lifted off its transporter up to the payload changeout room. Inside the canister are the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3, the payload for mission STS-118. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The rollout of Space Shuttle Endeavour to Launch Pad 39A is expected to begin tonight. Originally planned for this morning, the move was canceled by NASA managers because unfavorable weather was predicted to arrive in the launch area before the vehicle would be secured at the pad.

The crawler-transporter will carry the space shuttle assembly on the 3.4-mile journey to the launch pad, a trip that typically takes six to seven hours. NASA TV will provide highlights of the rollout.

During the STS-118 mission, Endeavour will carry into orbit the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3. The payload was delivered Sunday to the launch pad's payload changeout room.

NASA is quickly gearing up for the shuttle's next visit to the International Space Station, targeted for an Aug. 7 launch. The mission will mark the first flight of Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan, the teacher-turned-astronaut whose association with NASA began more than 20 years ago.

STS-118 will be the first flight for Endeavour since 2002.

Source: NASA

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