Search for life in space getting closer

Jun 07, 2007

Scientists in Britain say they are making remarkable advances in the search for life in other solar systems, though results are more than a decade off.

Glenn White of Open University said a European Space Agency mission called Darwin, due for launch in 2018, will scan 500 stars and study the light from 50 planets to seek vital signs, The Telegraph said Wednesday.

"Once the mission gets up, we are pretty sure that, if there is life out there, we are going to have an extremely high probability of telling you whether life has started on a planet," said White.

Michael Perryman, formerly of the ESA, said aliens could be eavesdropping on Earth, the British newspaper reported.

"As from 1927, we have been propagating outwards from Earth, a very specific indicator of our existence." Those radio waves are now 80 light years away. "If there is intelligent life out there, they sure as hell know we are here," he said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA astronaut memorial stirs memories for shuttle veteran (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sundance doc examines real-life Close Encounter

8 hours ago

Earth authorities are completely unprepared for the arrival of alien visitors and worried humans should ready themselves by watching a groundbreaking documentary, the film's director boasts.

Gully patterns document Martian climate cycles

Jan 28, 2015

Geologists from Brown University have found new evidence that glacier-like ice deposits advanced and retreated multiple times in the midlatitude regions of Mars in the relatively recent past.

Recommended for you

Scientists launch CubeSats into radiation belts

15 hours ago

Twin, pintsized satellites built in part at the University of New Hampshire's Space Science Center will be launched into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at 9:20 a.m. (EST) Thursday, January ...

Cassini catches Titan naked in the solar wind

15 hours ago

(Phys.org)—Researchers studying data from NASA's Cassini mission have observed that Saturn's largest moon, Titan, behaves much like Venus, Mars or a comet when exposed to the raw power of the solar wind. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.