Scottish zoo fears panda miscarriage (Update)

Sep 01, 2014
Tian Tian ('Sweetie'), female giant panda, relaxes in her compound at Edinburgh Zoo, on August 9, 2013

Britain's only female giant panda, thought to be pregnant, has passed her due date with no sign of a panda baby appearing.

Edinburgh Zoo's Tian Tian should have gone into labour over the weekend, according to experts, but tests indicated she may have miscarried.

"Giant panda Tian Tian is now past her due date and the evidence suggests that this may be bad news," said Iain Valentine, director of giant pandas for the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland.

"She is still displaying some of the behaviours of a pregnant panda, but the scientific data from the urine analysis of her hormones is becoming more atypical. "

The 10-year-old pandas Tian Tian (Sweetie) and male Yang Guang (Sunshine), on loan from China, are the first giant pandas to live in Britain for 17 years. Tian Tian lost a cub at a late term last year.

Animal protection group OneKind said Edinburgh Zoo should abandon attempts to breed a baby panda.

"Unlike a human mother who makes the choice to undergo artificial insemination, Tian Tian has no say in whether she has these procedures," said OneKind policy director Libby Anderson.

Explore further: Giant panda 'believed' pregnant at Edinburgh Zoo (Update)

Related Stories

Love-shy panda artificially inseminated

Apr 15, 2014

Britain's only female giant panda, Tian Tian, has been artificially inseminated after failing to mate with her male partner Yang Guang, Edinburgh Zoo said Tuesday.

British panda given helping hand in quest for cub

Apr 21, 2013

Experts at Edinburgh Zoo in Scotland have artificially inseminated Britain's only female giant panda Tian Tian after she failed to mate with her male partner, Yang Guang, the zoo announced on Sunday.

Recommended for you

Why the seahorse's tail is square

5 hours ago

Why is the seahorse's tail square? An international team of researchers has found the answer and it could lead to building better robots and medical devices. In a nutshell, a tail made of square, overlapping ...

Insect legs give clues to improving aircraft design

16 hours ago

Insect legs could help engineers improve the safety of long tubular structures used in aircraft to reduce weight and in hospital equipment, such as catheters. Scientists from Trinity College Dublin are looking ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.