Washington scientists studying sick grizzly

January 17, 2014

Scientists at Washington State University are treating a 3-year-old female grizzly bear that has been suffering seizures.

The bear named "Lucy" came from Montana Grizzly Encounter in Bozeman, Mont.

The bear was brought to Washington State University on Thursday after suffering two grand mal seizures last week for no apparent reason. Since then she has become more aggressive and lethargic at the same time.

Scientists at WSU conducted an MRI evaluation of her head and neck, looking for a case. The bear will undergo a complete examination and diagnostic work-up.

Explore further: Grizzly bears move into polar bear habitat in Manitoba, Canada

Related Stories

US mulls lifting protected status for grizzly bear

December 12, 2013

US wildlife managers on Thursday recommended lifting endangered species protection for grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park, which, if approved, could open the way for them to be hunted again.

Polar bear dies at South African zoo

January 15, 2014

One of South Africa's two polar bears has died at the Johannesburg Zoo, leaving its mate now believed to be the only polar bear in Africa, a veterinarian said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Plastic in 99 percent of seabirds by 2050

August 31, 2015

Researchers from CSIRO and Imperial College London have assessed how widespread the threat of plastic is for the world's seabirds, including albatrosses, shearwaters and penguins, and found the majority of seabird species ...

Researchers unveil DNA-guided 3-D printing of human tissue

August 31, 2015

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These ...

Study shows female frogs susceptible to 'decoy effect'

August 28, 2015

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers has found that female túngaras, frogs that live in parts of Mexico and Central and South America, appear to be susceptible to the "decoy effect." In their paper published in the journal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.