Space art eyes creativity in tech at Smithsonian

July 24, 2013 by Brett Zongker

(AP)—The familiar exteriors of astronauts' space suits often hide all of the ingenuity and mechanics that are built inside and were first imagined as "wearable spacecraft."

Now a new art exhibit, "Suited for Space," opening Friday at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, highlights the creativity behind the suits that allowed humans to explore the moon and aspire to fly farther from earth.

X-ray images and photographs show the suits in intricate detail. The show is traveling next to Tampa, Philadelphia and Seattle.

Two companion exhibits also highlight 50 artworks added to the Smithsonian's growing space art collection over the past decade. They include portraits of astronomer Carl Sagan, astrophysicist Neal deGrasse Tyson and a photograph of first female shuttle commander Eileen Collins by photographer Annie Leibovitz.

Explore further: Space Shuttle Discovery headed to the Smithsonian

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