Billion-pixel view of Mars comes from Curiosity rover

June 19, 2013
This is a reduced version of panorama from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity with 1.3 billion pixels in the full-resolution version. It shows Curiosity at the "Rocknest" site where the rover scooped up samples of windblown dust and sand. Curiosity used three cameras to take the component images on several different days between Oct. 5 and Nov. 16, 2012. Viewers can explore this image with pan and zoom controls at http://mars.nasa.gov/bp1/ . Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

(Phys.org) —A billion-pixel view from the surface of Mars, from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, offers armchair explorers a way to examine one part of the Red Planet in great detail.

The first -produced view from the surface of Mars larger than one billion pixels stitches together nearly 900 exposures taken by cameras onboard Curiosity and shows details of the landscape along the rover's route.

The 1.3-billion-pixel image is available for perusal with pan and zoom tools at: mars.nasa.gov/bp1/ .

The full-circle scene surrounds the site where Curiosity collected its first scoops of dusty sand at a windblown patch called "Rocknest," and extends to Mount Sharp on the horizon.

"It gives a sense of place and really shows off the cameras' capabilities," said Bob Deen of the Multi-Mission Image Processing Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "You can see the context and also zoom in to see very fine details."

Deen assembled the product using 850 frames from the telephoto camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera instrument, supplemented with 21 frames from the Mastcam's wider-angle camera and 25 black-and-white frames—mostly of the rover itself—from the . The images were taken on several different Mars days between Oct. 5 and Nov. 16, 2012. Raw single-frame images received from Curiosity are promptly posted on a public website at: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/ . Mars fans worldwide have used those images to assemble mosaic views, including at least one gigapixel scene.

The new mosaic from NASA shows illumination effects from variations in the time of day for pieces of the mosaic. It also shows variations in the clarity of the atmosphere due to variable dustiness during the month while the images were acquired.

NASA's Laboratory project is using Curiosity and the rover's 10 to investigate the environmental history within Gale Crater, a location where the project has found that conditions were long ago favorable for microbial life.

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TMBLAIR
1 / 5 (1) Jun 19, 2013
Dang, I guess I only get as many pixels as my monitor supports.
TMBLAIR
1 / 5 (1) Jun 19, 2013
I got four or five pixels an inch...
Egleton
1.7 / 5 (6) Jun 20, 2013
I still wish that they had a microphone on board. Then the illusion would have been more real. One little microphone. Is that too much to ask? How much did that thing cost anyway? So as a percentage of the cost the microphone would have been?
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (1) Jun 20, 2013
Could probably derive a sound from light reflection & polarisation modulation, worth a mathematically inspired physicist giving this some thought...!
Requiem
1 / 5 (4) Jun 20, 2013
Mars has 100 times less air density than Earth does. Microphones may not be effective.
Trewoor
1 / 5 (1) Jun 20, 2013
Some stars are visible! who is going to tell me which starts are they...? :)

http://www.freeim...u454.png
http://www.freeim...6auh.png

mjp
not rated yet Jun 20, 2013
I opened the 1.3 billion pixel panoramic photo (via the supplied link: mars.nasa.gov/bp1/ ) and just to see what might be there, zoomed in on the (approximate) center and saw what looks like a 2-3 inch triangular piece of bright white paper or plastic. There is no scale so it could even be a foot or a meter across. It's tucked in between the rocks in approximately the center of the panorama picture. Is this near the area where debris from the landing equipment might have blown? Surely someone else has noticed this already.

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