Oreskes, professor at NYC's Hunter College, dies

Mar 02, 2013 by Meghan Barr
This undated family photo shows Irwin Oreskes. Oreskes, a professor emeritus at New York's Hunter College who studied biochemistry and taught laboratory science, died Friday, March 1, 2013 in New York. He was 86. (AP Photo/Oreskes Family Photo)

(AP)—A professor emeritus at New York City's Hunter College who studied biochemistry and taught laboratory science has died. Irwin Oreskes was 86.

He suffered a brain hemorrhage after a fall and died Friday in Manhattan.

Oreskes was a beloved teacher and mentor to generations of students. He was a member of the City University of New York doctoral faculty in biochemistry until his retirement from Hunter College in 2003.

In 1970, he founded the college's Medical Laboratory Sciences Program, the largest clinical technology program in New York state.

He took pride in the economically disadvantaged students and minorities he mentored and encouraged in their careers.

Oreskes was a 1949 graduate of City College. He received a master's degree from Brooklyn College and a doctorate from CUNY. He served in the Army during World War II.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. An earlier story is below.

Irwin Oreskes, a professor emeritus at Hunter College who studied biochemistry and taught laboratory science, has died at age 86.

Oreskes, who died on Friday in Manhattan, was a member of the City University of New York doctoral faculty in biochemistry until his retirement from Hunter College in 2003. He was a beloved teacher and mentor to generations of students.

In 1970, Oreskes founded the college's Medical Laboratory Sciences Program, the largest clinical technology program in New York state. That program was one of the building blocks for the School of Health Sciences, which opened in 1974 at the Brookdale Health Science Center. Oreskes served as the school's dean for several years.

Former Hunter College President Paul LeClerc said Oreskes was "one of the single best faculty members I've ever had the pleasure of knowing and working with."

"He was smart, principled, balanced in his judgments, totally dedicated to the welfare of Hunter College and its students and a source of unfailingly wise counsel to me," said LeClerc, who was Hunter's president from 1988 until 1993.

Oreskes took pride in the economically disadvantaged students, minorities, immigrants and women he mentored and encouraged in their academic and professional careers.

He was a member of the American Association of Immunologists, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry and the American College of Rheumatology. He co-authored the book "Rheumatology for the Health Care Professional."

Much of his scientific research was devoted to the immunology of rheumatoid factor and altered immunoglobulin G in rheumatic diseases.

Oreskes, a 1949 graduate of City College, received a master's degree from Brooklyn College and a doctorate from CUNY. He served in the Army during World War II.

Oreskes believed in the power of scientific thinking and the free public education offered by New York City, said his son Michael Oreskes, senior managing editor at The Associated Press.

"He was a product of that education: an immigrant's kid who learned to be a scientist," Michael Oreskes said. "And he carried on that tradition by building a school at City University that gave immigrants and their kids a path to success in America."

Besides Michael Oreskes, Irwin Oreskes also is survived by his wife, Susan Oreskes; his other children, Naomi Oreskes, a science historian, Daniel Oreskes, an actor, and Rebecca Oreskes, a writer and former ranger with the U.S. Forest Service, and five grandchildren.

His funeral will be held on Sunday at Jewish Community Chapel.

Explore further: Best of Last Week – quantum pigeonholing, a hoverbike drone project and the sun goes quiet

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Teaching the Teachers

Oct 15, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Research experiences for science teachers can have a direct impact on the achievement of their students, increasing their performance significantly on state assessments. There are also economic ...

Recommended for you

How to win a Tour de France sprint

Jul 22, 2014

The final dash to the line in a Tour de France sprint finish may appear to the bystander to be a mess of bodies trying to cram into the width of a road, but there is a high degree of strategy involved. It ...

User comments : 0