Online plan to boost Philippine eagle numbers

Feb 28, 2013
A Philippine Eagle (Pithecopaga jefferyi) is shown at the Philippine Eagle Center, Davao City, in 2011. The mating rituals of two captive Philippine eagles are being broadcast live over the Internet to rally global support for saving of the world's rarest and biggest raptors, conservationists said Thursday.

The mating rituals of two captive Philippine eagles are being broadcast live over the Internet to rally global support for saving of the world's rarest and biggest raptors, conservationists said Thursday.

Livestreaming the pair gives a global Internet audience a rare insight into the courtship, mating and chick-rearing habits of the birds, which could soon become extinct, said Philippine Eagle Foundation spokesman Rolando Pinsoy.

"This will give everyone a chance to learn more about this species and understand why we have to save them," Pinsoy told AFP.

Customarily, the female lays a single egg in November or December and the chick hatches a month later, he said.

In a project backed by the US-based Raptor Resource Project and the Internet videosharing site Ustream.tv, the pair can now be viewed 24 hours a day over the next 12 months at www.ustream.tv/recorded/29615691

"Even for , there is so much more that we need to learn about this species," Pinsoy said.

Graphic fact file on the Philippine eagle, one of the world's rarest raptors. The mating rituals of two captive Philippine eagles are being broadcast live over the Internet to rally global support for saving of the world's rarest and biggest raptors, conservationists said Thursday.

The Philippine eagle, or Pithecophaga jefferyi, is the world's largest eagle in terms of length. It is found only in the country's vanishing forests, where hunting, logging and all threaten its survival.

The bird, with a distinctive shaggy and cream-coloured crest, grows to up to 3.35 feet (one metre) in length with a of up to seven feet.

According to the foundation and the International Union for the , there are only about between 180 to 500 pairs in the wild.

The two eagles involved in the livestreaming project have both been rescued from hunters, rehabilitated and paired, Pinsoy said.

They have regularly been producing chicks for the foundation's captive breeding programme near the southern city of Davao, he added.

Explore further: Scientist creates automatic birdsong recognition app

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Offspring for first captive-bred Philippine eagle

Feb 14, 2013

The first Philippine eagle bred in captivity has sired her first offspring, in what conservationists said Thursday was a small victory in efforts to save one of the world's rarest raptors.

Trapping threatens near-extinct Philippine eagle

Apr 28, 2011

Conservationists raised alarm Thursday over the future of the near-extinct Philippine eagle after several maimed or diseased birds were retrieved from captivity over recent months.

Near-extinct Philippine eagle shot dead

Oct 07, 2011

An endangered Philippine eagle, one of only a few hundred left in the world, has been shot dead, a conservation group that had previously rescued the bird said Friday.

New eagle crowding nesting eagle pair

Feb 18, 2008

A pair of bald eagles nesting in Virginia's Norfolk Botanical Garden are used to being visited by people, but now must deal with an interloping female eagle.

US eagle webcam becomes internet sensation

Apr 05, 2011

Cameras installed high in a tree in the US state of Iowa have made an internet sensation of a family of bald eagles, whose nest is streamed online live day and night.

Recommended for you

Science casts light on sex in the orchard

10 hours ago

Persimmons are among the small club of plants with separate sexes—individual trees are either male or female. Now scientists at the University of California, Davis, and Kyoto University in Japan have discovered ...

Four new dragon millipedes found in China

12 hours ago

A team of speleobiologists from the South China Agriculture University and the Russian Academy of Sciences have described four new species of the dragon millipedes from southern China, two of which seem to ...

Scientist creates automatic birdsong recognition app

15 hours ago

Dr Dan Stowell, an EPSRC Research Fellow in QMUL's School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has used a grant from Queen Mary Innovation to develop a prototype for an app that turns his research ...

New research reveals fish are smarter than we thought

16 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A new study from researchers in our Department of Psychology with colleagues at Queen Mary University of London has reported the first evidence that fish are able to process multiple objects ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.