Dark matter and galaxies part ways in collision between hefty galaxy clusters

Feb 28, 2013
Credit: NASA, ESA, CFHT, CXO, M.J. Jee (University of California, Davis), and A. Mahdavi (San Francisco State University)

(Phys.org)—This composite image shows the distribution of dark matter, galaxies, and hot gas in the core of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 520, formed from a violent collision of massive galaxy clusters that is located about 2.4 billion light years from Earth.

Data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory show the hot gas in the colliding clusters colored in green. The gas provides evidence that a collision took place. Optical data from NASA's and the Canada-France- (CFHT) in Hawaii are shown in red, green, and blue. Starlight from galaxies within the clusters, derived from observations by the CFHT and smoothed to show the location of most of the galaxies, is colored orange.

The blue-colored areas pinpoint the location of most of the mass in the cluster, which is dominated by dark matter. Dark matter is an invisible substance that makes up most of the universe's mass. The dark-matter map was derived from the Hubble observations, by detecting how light from distant objects is distorted by the , an effect called gravitational lensing. The blend of blue and green in the center of the image reveals that a clump of dark matter (which can be seen by mousing over the image) resides near most of the hot gas, where very few galaxies are found.

This finding confirms previous observations of a dark-matter core in the cluster announced in 2007. The result could present a challenge to basic theories of dark matter, which predict that galaxies should be anchored to dark matter, even during the shock of a powerful collision.

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More information: Jee, M. et al, 2012, ApJ 747, 96. arXiv:1202.6368

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User comments : 13

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Tuxford
1.4 / 5 (11) Feb 28, 2013
No, the gas provides evidence that in the space surrounding massive galaxies, that nucleation of new matter slowly takes place, not that galactic collisions took place. Dark matter halos surrounding our galaxy has recently been established. Further, dark matter has been found to be largely absent within our galaxy.

Dark matter presence is inferred from light refraction. The region of space in a critical state for nucleating new matter is that empty space surrounding large masses like galaxies. This type of space can refract light in LaViolette's SubQuantum Kinectics. Thus, the region sandwiched between these massive clusters is a prime example of this effect.

See my prediction of March 3, 2012 herein:

http://phys.org/n...ion.html
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (5) Feb 28, 2013
vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (5) Feb 28, 2013
Sub: Science to progress- Cosmology Comprehension
Cosmology as science must progress from adding further confusion to clear any feasible ambiguity.
The state of anarchy prevails -Dark matter, Dark Energy and Super-imposed ignorance through gravity.
http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv
Wisdom must prevail to understand the cosmic function at this scale-Abell 520 at 2.4 Billion LY, and distribution of Energy which must be evident from and beyond 100,000 Light Years- I call it heart and Center of Universe. Uplink mode will be different from the Downlink mode towards milky Way Frame.
http://vidyardhic...ion.html
Shinichi D_
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 01, 2013
http://science.time.com/2013/02/26/cosmic-fuggedaboudit-dark-matter-may-not-exist-at-all/?hpt=hp_c2


But since it's a mouthful, we refer to this group of phenomena as 'dark matter'.
yyz
5 / 5 (6) Mar 01, 2013
I'm a bit puzzled as to why this story based on a year old finding is newsworthy, the initial results already described in an earlier PO article (with the same multiwavelength image of Abell 520!): http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv

Even more puzzling is why there is no mention of a recent study, using deeper, more comprehensive Hubble observations, that found no evidence for a DM core in Abell 520 (and no contradiction with LCDM). PO even covered this new finding: http://phys.org/n...tml#nRlv

Btw, the new study of Abell 520 described in that article can be found here: http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2143

Pyle
3 / 5 (4) Mar 01, 2013
My guess is the editors saw February and threw it up. Not noticing that it was Feb 2012. Very funny.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (5) Mar 01, 2013
why there is no mention of a recent study, using deeper, more comprehensive Hubble observations
Because the astrophysicists are losing mutual contact about their research and they just pile random publications like the robots.
aether_displacement
1 / 5 (7) Mar 03, 2013
Aether has mass. Aether physically occupies three dimensional space. Aether is physically displaced by matter. There is no such thing as non-baryonic dark matter anchored to matter. Matter moves through and displaces the aether.

Galaxy clusters move through and displace the aether.

A 'new dark force' is more speculative than understanding space itself has mass.

'Galactic Pile-Up May Point to Mysterious New Dark Force in the Universe'

It's not a new force. It's the aether displaced by each of the galaxies interacting analogous to the bow waves of two boats which pass by each other.

The Milky Way's halo is what is referred to as the curvature of spacetime.

The Milky Way's halo is the state of displacement of the aether.

The geometrical representation of gravity as curved spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the aether.

Displaced aether pushing back toward matter is gravity.
Maggnus
5 / 5 (5) Mar 03, 2013
Good lord what a cluster doink of quacks. God forbid any article mention DM and the quacks gather like, well, ducks to a pond.
Fleetfoot
5 / 5 (1) Mar 03, 2013
Aether has mass. .. There is no such thing as non-baryonic dark matter anchored to matter.


If your hypothetical aether has mass and isn't made of baryons, it qualifies as "non-baryonic dark matter".

Matter moves through and displaces the aether.


That would create drag, orbits would decay. Matter would have to move through the aether without displacing it just as neutrinos pass through the Earth (but it needs to be a solid to explain optical polarization).
aether_displacement
1 / 5 (4) Mar 03, 2013
If your hypothetical aether has mass and isn't made of baryons, it qualifies as "non-baryonic dark matter".


Non-baryonic dark matter is hypothesized to be anchored to matter. Matter moves through and displaces the aether.

Matter moves through and displaces the aether.


That would create drag, orbits would decay.


The incompressible fluid described in the following article is the gravitational aether.

arxiv 1212.4176

The following article describes a 'back reaction' associated with the "fluidic" nature of space itself. This is the displaced aether 'displacing back'.

arxiv 1208.3458

The aether is, or behaves similar to, a supersolid.

The following article describes the aether as that which produces resistance to acceleration and is responsible for the increase in mass of an object with velocity.

arxiv 1202.4611

The relativistc mass of an object is the mass of the object and the mass of the aether displaced by the object.
Fleetfoot
5 / 5 (2) Mar 04, 2013
If your hypothetical aether has mass and isn't made of baryons, it qualifies as "non-baryonic dark matter".


Non-baryonic dark matter is hypothesized to be anchored to matter. Matter moves through and displaces the aether.


Normal matter is "anchored" to dark matter only by its gravitational interaction. You said your aether had mass which would mean it would also produce and be affected by gravity. If it doesn't interact with EM then it meets the requirements to be dark matter.
aether_displacement
1 / 5 (2) Mar 04, 2013
Normal matter is "anchored" to dark matter only by its gravitational interaction. You said your aether had mass which would mean it would also produce and be affected by gravity. If it doesn't interact with EM then it meets the requirements to be dark matter.


Displaced aether pushing back and exerting inward pressure toward matter is gravity.

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