Australia heatwave part of global trend: IPCC chief

Jan 15, 2013
The southern edge of the Redbank fire burns in New South Wales on January 15, 2013, in this photo provided by the rural Fire Service of New South Wales. Australia's extreme summer heatwave, which caused devastating bushfires and saw temperature forecasts go off the scale, is part of a global warming trend, the UN's climate panel chief said Tuesday.

Australia's extreme summer heatwave, which caused devastating bushfires and saw temperature forecasts go off the scale, is part of a global warming trend, the UN's climate panel chief said Tuesday.

As the 250 lead authors of the (IPCC)'s next major report meet in the southern Australian city of Hobart, the body's chairman Rajendra Pachauri said the link was clear.

"If you look at the trend then I think that's pretty unmistakable and any proper analysis would tell you that we are heading in that direction," Pachauri told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Pachauri said the planet was in line for a of "anywhere from 1.1 degrees Celsius to 6.4 degree Celsius" (2.0 to 11.5 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of this century.

"Now this depends on the kind of economic growth you get, a whole lot of other drivers that would essentially lead to climate change," he said.

"But if you're going to end up towards the upper end, then that clearly is a very, very serious outcome that we're looking at."

A scrubfire burns a hillside south of Bookham, near Yass in New South Wales state, on January 11, 2013. Australia has experienced extreme summer heat, increasing the dangers from scores of bushfires which have destroyed more than 100 homes.

Asked about his worries about climate change, he said: "Yes, I am concerned no doubt, but I also have a high opinion of human wisdom that I think at some stage we will bring about change."

Australia has experienced extreme , increasing the dangers from scores of which have destroyed more than 100 homes.

Most of these were on the southern which is known for its cooler climate and where the IPCC authors are meeting.

The government's Climate Commission warned at the weekend that the current weather was a taste of things to come, with heatwaves likely to be more frequent and intense in the future.

Scott Power, one of the experts in Hobart for the talks, said bushfires and were all "part and parcel" of living in Australia during summer but climate change increased the likelihood of such events.

"It's clear that these sorts of things do become more common under climate change," Power told a news conference ahead of the talks.

The experts gathered in Hobart are working on the IPCC's report due in September.

Pachauri said the leaking of parts of its draft was "very unfortunate" but gave no indication of the final version as he defended the IPCC's attempt to be inclusive and to get as many expert reviews as possible.

"I'm absolutely certain that what we will get is a very solid, very robust and scientifically defensible report," he said.

In the latest leak, blogger Donna Laframboise published thousands of pages of the draft last week, denouncing what she called a lack of transparency in the process and claiming the IPCC was attaching too much weight to the input of environmentalists rather than scientists.

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User comments : 8

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VendicarD
3 / 5 (6) Jan 15, 2013
Still no denialists here?

What is going on? Are the checks late?

They would normally be here like maggots looking for a fresh meal.

Fortunately they are a dying breed.

I see that I will need to call them...

Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...
Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...
Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...
Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...
Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...
Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...
Here Tardie, Tardie, Tardie, Tardie...

There's a good Tardie...

gregor1
2.4 / 5 (7) Jan 15, 2013
Power says "It's clear that these sorts of things do become more common under climate change," despite the fact that he has no evidence as this editorial from nature attests.http://www.nature...-1.11428
If they did have evidence the courts would be having a field day and the Developed World would be financially crippled. Ironically most of the alarmist academics who've beat this thing up, would be out of work as crippled governments won't be able to find the funds. As for green activists, their incomes are likely to plummet too. I'm pretty sure the kleptocrats of the developing world will pocket the billions in reparations and won't be donating much to anyone.
Shootist
1 / 5 (5) Jan 15, 2013
The IPCC of fudged emails? Yes, a bastion of truth, justice and,

Dairy farms in Greenland 'lo these last 800 years? Nay, it is too cold.

It is too cold.

Been growing wine grapes in Scotland (and Nova Scotia) 'lo these last 800 years? No. It is too cold.

It is too cold.

Any centuries old vineyards above the 40th parallel? There were, 800 years ago. It is too cold now. These vineyards were extant for centuries.

Even a GREELIBPROG has got to understand it was warm enough for those crops and dairy farms to survive. (That) It means it was warmer, for centuries, than it is today.

Your Global Warming kung fu is weak.
SteveS
3 / 5 (3) Jan 16, 2013
Dairy farms in Greenland 'lo these last 800 years? Nay, it is too cold.

Been growing wine grapes in Scotland (and Nova Scotia) 'lo these last 800 years? No. It is too cold.


There has never been any Scotish vineyards, and it has been warm enough for "dairy farms" of the type they had during the period of Norse settlement for some time now.
http://nome.color...vern.pdf
StarGazer2011
2 / 5 (4) Jan 16, 2013
The forecasts went 'off the scale'; the temperatures didnt. One day after releasing the 'off the scale' forecast the alarmist
Bureau of Meteorology revised them downwards. Sorta like CAGW all over; scary forecasts which turn out to be complete rubbish.
RealScience
5 / 5 (3) Jan 16, 2013
@shootist - there are also quite a few vineyards now in southern Ontario (north of the 40th parallel) and even in southern Quebec (north of the 45th parallel, and slightly colder than Nova Scotia). A few of them are even starting to produce decent wine.

The medieval warm period lasted for several hundred years, giving ice in Greenland more time to melt that we have in the recent warming period. So farms showing up as the ice melts does NOT prove that it was warmer then, just that it currently hasn't been AS WARM FOR AS LONG yet.
The medieval warm period was right about as warm as the past two decades, and at most ~1C warmer. If the present rate of warming continues, we will shoot by even that pretty quickly.

So even your cherry-picked 'it is too cold' statements are weak.
(And I'm no rabid greenie - I get downvoted every time I point out that an ice age would be even worse than global warming).
RealScience
5 / 5 (2) Jan 16, 2013
@Vendicar - even when you are right your childish insults are counterproductive. People harden their positions and are less likely to change their minds when they are insulted.

So why don't you reply with facts and figures (as you sometimes do), and lay off the insults.
Maggnus
1 / 5 (1) Jan 17, 2013
If they did have evidence the courts would be having a field day and the Developed World would be financially crippled. Ironically most of the alarmist academics who've beat this thing up, would be out of work as crippled governments won't be able to find the funds. As for green activists, their incomes are likely to plummet too. I'm pretty sure the kleptocrats of the developing world will pocket the billions in reparations and won't be donating much to anyone.

Well at least you managed to find something reasonably current!
It is not said by most climatologist, nor most scientists in general, than any one event is directly tied to global warming. Of course, that is not what Pachauri said either.It is clear, however, that the change in Earth's climate will result in a trend towards things like hotter heat waves, which IS what Pachauri said. Lawsuits are unlikely, but I wouldn't count them out just yet. International law is fickle and complicated, and requires specialized training