Sneezing sea lion dies after treatment at NY zoo

Oct 06, 2012

(AP)—A sea lion that had been receiving treatment for sneezing has died unexpectedly at a New York zoo.

The 6-year-old male sea lion was named Puff. It was being treated for under anesthesia when it died Thursday at the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester.

Zoo official Dr. Jeff Wyatt tells the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle newspaper (http://on.rocne.ws/VGJUcz ) a necropsy confirms an infectious sinus condition that is unusual and doesn't present a danger for the zoo's three other .

The 490-pound Puff had been receiving treatment for months for sneezing, bloody mucus and .

The zoo's director says healthy sea lions usually live for at least 15 to 20 years. One of the zoo's other sea lions is 21 years old.

Puff was born at SeaWorld Orlando, in Florida.

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