Remains of 15 found in ancient Mexican settlement

Jul 13, 2012
An unearthed skeleton dating back about 700 years is seen at a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

(AP) — Archaeologists in Mexico City have unearthed the skulls and other bones of 15 people, most of them the children of traveling merchants during Aztec times.

Researcher Alejandra Jasso Pena says they also found ceramic flutes, bowls, incense burners, the remains of a dog that was sacrificed to accompany a child in the afterlife and other artifacts of a pre-Columbian civilization.

An unearthed skeleton of a child dating back about 700 years is seen at a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Jasso Pena said Friday that construction was about to start on five buildings in a Mexico City neighborhood when the National Institute of Anthropology and History asked to carry out an excavation of the site first.

Pictured is an unearthed ceramic object from a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Experts suspected the site was an important ceremonial center for the Tepanec tribe between 1200 and 1300. The influential traders living there were called Pochtecas.

say excavation is continuing at the site.

Archeologists stand next to a table displaying objects unearthed from a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Pictured is a mask unearthed from a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Pictured is an unearthed flute from a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

A worker pushes a wheelbarrow through a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of the Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

Workers clean an area of a recently discovered archeological site in Mexico City, Friday, July 13, 2012. According to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, the site is about 700 years old and is a neighborhood of the Tepaneca merchants. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)


Explore further: New branch added to European family tree

4.8 /5 (4 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Experts: Ancient Mexicans crossbred wolf-dogs

Dec 16, 2010

(AP) -- Mexican researchers said Wednesday they have identified jaw bones found in the pre-Hispanic ruins of Teotihuacan as those of wolf-dogs that were apparently crossbred as a symbol of the city's warriors.

Original offering found at Teotihuacan pyramid

Dec 14, 2011

Archaeologists announced Tuesday that they dug to the very core of Mexico's tallest pyramid and found what may be the original ceremonial offering placed on the site of the Pyramid of the Sun before construction began.

Subway work unearths ancient road in Greece

Jun 26, 2012

(AP) — Archaeologists in Greece's second-largest city have uncovered a 70-meter (230-foot) section of an ancient road built by the Romans that was city's main travel artery nearly 2,000 years ago.

Mexico: Maya tomb find could help explain collapse

Jan 28, 2010

(AP) -- Mexican archaeologists have found an 1,100-year-old tomb from the twilight of the Maya civilization that they hope may shed light on what happened to the once-glorious culture.

Recommended for you

New branch added to European family tree

Sep 17, 2014

The setting: Europe, about 7,500 years ago. Agriculture was sweeping in from the Near East, bringing early farmers into contact with hunter-gatherers who had already been living in Europe for tens of thousands ...

'Hidden Treasure of Rome' project unveiled

Sep 16, 2014

For more than a century, hundreds of thousands of historical artifacts dating back to before the founding of Rome have been stored in crates in the Capitoline Museums of Rome, where they have remained mostly untouched. Now, ...

NOAA team reveals forgotten ghost ships off Golden Gate

Sep 16, 2014

A team of NOAA researchers today confirmed the discovery just outside San Francisco's Golden Gate strait of the 1910 shipwreck SS Selja and an unidentified early steam tugboat wreck tagged the "mystery wreck." ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

ultrabrad
not rated yet Jul 14, 2012
What sort of neighborhood was it? I didn't quite catch that. Also, how old is the site?