UN climate watchdog backs new greenhouse gas protocol

Jun 08, 2012
A UN climate science task force urged on Thursday the adoption of new measures aimed at providing the broadest and most accurate snapshot of carbon emissions ahead of Rio+20.

A UN climate science task force urged on Thursday the adoption of new measures aimed at providing the broadest and most accurate snapshot of carbon emissions ahead of Rio+20.

Armed with the latest unveiled in Geneva by the (IPCC), countries will soon be able to identify more precisely than ever their biggest sources of emissions.

The greatest potential is in developing countries, where the greatest producers of are land use and forestry.

These areas are notoriously difficult to get data from, according to the IPCC, but it is vital to do so, given that they collectively contain more carbon than is present in the atmosphere.

Although the IPCC's Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI) has no powers to enforce implementation of its latest recommendations, there is every hope that its softly-softly approach will find plenty of takers by October 2013, the deadline for the new measures to be rolled out.

TFI co-chair Thelma Krug said: "I am very optimistic about these changes which fill methodology gaps in the 2006 guidelines.

"Taking forestry as an example, we are incentivising countries to improve their knowledge of the sector, giving them the chance to take measures to avoid major emissions."

The IPCC announcement comes ahead of the Rio+20 environmental summit due to begin on June 20.

The changes were made at the request of the (UNFCCC). For many developing countries still using the IPCC's 1996 guidelines it is a chance to update their emissions-gathering protocols.

"There's always new science that comes available to make reporting emissions more easily and effectively and this is especially important for developing countries," Krug said.

"We want to ensure countries report in a complete way, a transparent way and that these findings are consistent over time."

Explore further: Deforestation could intensify climate change in Congo Basin by half

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User comments : 5

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NotParker
2.3 / 5 (9) Jun 08, 2012
I thought the largest source of emissions was the massive hordes of AGW cult members descending on exotic locations in their private jets to spend two weeks partying in first class hotels and pretending to do something about the natural climate cycles?
Shelgeyr
4.3 / 5 (6) Jun 08, 2012
UN climate watchdog backs new greenhouse gas protocol


In other news, dog bites man.
ted208
2.6 / 5 (5) Jun 08, 2012
The shrink doom and gloom CAGW mongers will be grubbing around the finest hotels of Rio for an ever shrinking supply of money.

Will that be Lobster with Caviar or Boiled tofu sir???

Oh the humanity of it all!
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (4) Jun 08, 2012
As always, you thought wrong.

"I thought the largest source of emissions was the massive hordes of AGW cult members descending on exotic locations" - ParkerTard

You should just give up trying. You aren't up to the task.
NotParker
1 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2012
As usual the fanatics ignore all other climate factors to focus on CO2 as the bogeyman.

Bright sunshine is up.

http://sunshineho...us-tmax/

Real scientists think cleaner air has resulted in less aerosols and clouds resulting in more sunshine which as we know causes warming.

http://sunshineho...erlands/

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