Alien life searchers conference SETICon 2 held in Santa Clara

Jun 25, 2012 by Bob Yirka report
SETI's Alien Telescope Array (ATA) listens day and night for a signal from space. Credit: SETI

SETICon 2, a conference unlike any other, ran this past weekend in Santa Clara, California. In attendance were people from all walks of life whose area of interest intersects on the topic of the search for intelligent life somewhere other than here on planet Earth.

Thus, they were made up of scientists; from and other groups, artists, and even entertainers. The goal of the conference, which is set up and run by the Institute () is to share ideas on what has been discovered of late regarding the possibility of and what might lie ahead.

Fueling much of the discussion this time around (the first SETICon was held in 2010) are findings by NASA’s Kepler mission which is dedicated to looking for extraterrestrial life, regardless of form or degree of intelligence. Since 2009, the mission has uncovered the existence of over 2,300 exoplanets that researchers believe hold the possibility of harboring some forms of life. Most notably, due to the existence of that precious resources without which we here on this planet could not survive: water. Some scientists who actually work on the mission (Geoff Marcy, Jon Jenkins, Debra Fischer, etc.) spoke to those in attendance, as did astronauts Tom Jones and Mae Jemison.

This year’s conference, those in attendance noted, was much more upbeat than the last, as more information from Kepler becomes available, the numbers of planets that might have life on them keeps going up, making the possibility of detecting its presence more plausible than ever before. As noted by several speakers, the Kepler mission is helping to find planets farther away from their stars, rather than just those that are close enough to cause their star to appear to wobble to us due to planetary gravity effects. The new more sensitive telescopes are better able to discern planets that are not only farther (meaning cooler) from their star, but smaller, some of which may have water and are rocky, making them more Earthlike and thus potentially more likely to posses the conditions necessary for the kind of life we know and understand.

In addition to offerings talks, the conference also held panel discussions, interviews, and even screenings of movies, all aimed at opening the door to the possibility that extraterrestrial life might truly exist, and if it does, highlighting the fact that we are now in a better position than ever before to find evidence of its existence.

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baudrunner
2.8 / 5 (6) Jun 25, 2012
I still don't hold up much hope that SETI will ever detect an intelligent radio source from another planet. Not that life doesn't exist elsewhere, it's just that societies which have attained that level of technological sphistication where they can and do transmit information and data locally also limit the strength of radio transmissions to a level that we could not possibly detect from that far away. Those who point to the fact that we are still receiving signals from the Voyager probes should be reminded that by the time Voyager 2 is just one light year away from us, more than 22,000 years will have passed here, and I doubt very much that we will still be receiving information from them even if their nuclear power sources were still fully functional.
PussyCat_Eyes
2.4 / 5 (8) Jun 25, 2012
As NASA concentrates only on bacteria and the geology on other planets, SETI looks for intelligent life. I choose SETI as the most forward-looking and progressive agency who should also take a closer look at planets in our own solar system. After reading several books on the subject, I find it impossible that only microbes could be living on the thousands and millions of planets in every galaxy. It may take a longer time, but SETI will find intelligent life elsewhere in the universe, or they may find us. That scientists from NASA also attended the SETICon2 gives evidence that not all scientists are lock-step with only standard models and the status quo, etc.

Give them time, baudrunner.
MrVibrating
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 25, 2012
The search itself seems all but impotent without the means to visit any interesting extra-solar planets.

If the same resources spent on SETI were instead redirected towards the search for radical new propulsion systems, then SETI research would stand to reap the benefits of any successes, and would arguably be none the worse off if the effort proved fruitless...
Valik
4.2 / 5 (5) Jun 25, 2012
WE KNOW there are many intelligent beings and old civilizations out there, between trillion of stars and billions of galaxies, whatever their forms, pure energy, wild quantum spores, tall and slim, translucency... what we do not know is if there is any intelligent life ON EARTH.
PussyCat_Eyes
1.9 / 5 (10) Jun 25, 2012
LOL...how true, how true. Not to mention those of lesser intelligence on Phys.org who know nothing due to not cracking the books, and who only rely on Wikipedia and YouTube for info to wow other commenters to prove how brilliant he is...I think you know who mean....Blotto, who else.
:)
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.7 / 5 (18) Jun 25, 2012
tall and slim, translucency...
Hey pirouette/ritchieguy/russkiye/pussygalore somebody else believes in your 900 ft tall glass-headed sleeping-or-dead aliens. My stars.

From elsewhere:
It's also obvious that Blotto prefers to pick on females and he has chosen me because I can't fight back verbally.

I suppose it takes more than 60 posts a day? Like I say you are a dimwit regardless of gender.

Simple - tell us how Picts and Druids could have built Stonehenge. Substantiate your claims that affirmative action mandates quotas and firing people. Explain how gyroscopes can produce gravity or how a spaceplane could possibly trap and transport orbital antimatter. And address all those other cowpies you have dropped here as well.

You have every chance in the world to back up what you say, and this does not depend whatsoever on your gender, whatever it may be.

Justify this outrageous bullshit or be polite and courteous and honest and STFU. Can you do that?
PussyCat_Eyes
1.5 / 5 (8) Jun 25, 2012
I see that big lies are still being told about me by a true nutcase who morphs into his sock puppets and back again, and who believes that I am someone else that he has been chasing after, probably for a very long time. I keep telling him that I am not those people, but he persists in following me into threads in which he doesn't follow the topic and give his opinions in regard to that topic. He seems to live only to falsely attack me, and when someone points out to him that he is wrong, he continues with his tall stories about glassy-eyed space aliens and whatever else he can think of.
He misquotes me consistently as to the topics of which I opine. He seems obsessed with me and will tell all sorts of lies thinking that intelligent people really care what he's saying. It's become evident to me that he suffers from DISSOCIATE IDENTITY DISORDER, which has compelled him to make sock puppets for each of his multiple personalities. I only want to discuss the topic with intelligent people.
PussyCat_Eyes
1.4 / 5 (9) Jun 25, 2012
Sad, sad Blotto the clown...doesn't believe in possible intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. What a boring, droll person. Insanity and buffoonery must run in his family.
Torbjorn_Larsson_OM
4 / 5 (3) Jun 26, 2012
Kepler may speed up SETI a while, but it is a rather small volume of the MW they cover and at some distance as well.

@ baudrunner: SETI is a good search, but the Fermi question is badly constrained. Ordinary radio drowns in noise some light year out, you need large radio telescopes and a dedicated narrow transmission to communicate.

Which segues into this: There are two viable economies in interstellar space due to light speed limits. Those are information barter (which "customer drives" SETI search can catch) and colonization. Exploration and exploitation simply cost too much, even an interstellar nuclear driven Orion would cost 3 times what the ISS costs.

Here is my take on the colonization: Interplanetary colonization will naturally in most cases expand to the Oort cloud bodies. They provide everything for habitats (minerals, volatiles, fissiles for energy). So most colonization waves will be radio silent and artifact silent, there is no economy in going down deep gravity wells.
Torbjorn_Larsson_OM
4 / 5 (3) Jun 26, 2012
[cont] In other words migration between stars Oort clouds will be totally invisible. Several waves, who take on the order of Milky Way age (nearly as old as the universe) to cover a Milky Way volume, can be ongoing and we will never know.

@ MrVibrating: We can't just visit other planetary systems, too costly. But remote astrobiology will be very fruitful as we get statistics on characteristics of habitable and inhabited (oxygen atmosphere) planets. They will help constrain viable pathways from chemical to biological evolution, of which we currently have too many.
lbuz
4.3 / 5 (3) Jun 26, 2012
Just to bring things back down to Earth, did anybody else happen to note that the title photo is NOT the ATA, but seems to be part of the VLA, or are we all too focused on the stars to see what is not in front of our eyes?
http://en.wikiped...pe_Array
http://en.wikiped...ge_Array
PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (3) Jun 26, 2012
To be honest, I didn't notice the difference. I believe one is in Arecibo, PR, but the pic says ATA.
I was concentrating mainly on the conference details.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (4) Jun 26, 2012
Radio transmissions just don't seem to make sense for spacefaring entities (or intersetllar communications of any kind).

If you can travel through space significant distances then any kind of long distance communication by radio is severly outdated by the time it reaches the target. What would you even communicate about?

To get even a chance of having it received you need to constrain your beam. Unless you know where your target is some years ahead (e.g. a planetary colony) that's no use. SETI would never find such a signal unless it was pointed at Earth (and why should it be?)

If you have even close to light speed drives sending a physical information pod would be much more efficient. It could contain a LOT more information, wouldn't degrade/have problems with noise, be noly marginally slower and could even actively search for its target once it gets to the general vicinity it's supposed to deliver the message to. (Needless to say SETI would never find such carrier pigeons)
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (4) Jun 26, 2012
I do love SETI, but I really think we're going about it all wrong. What we would need are very long line (space based) radio telescopes to check for planets and their atmospheric compositions (checking for elements that rae products of technical or life processes and unlikley to be produced naturally). Such passive indicators would be much more likley to lead to success than trying to tap into phonelines that are, if at all present, surely bypassing our solar system by several light years.
Tachyon8491
2 / 5 (4) Jun 26, 2012
Metrodorus of Chios, presocratic philosopher asserted ""A single ear of corn in a large field is as strange as a single world in infinite space."

The SETI experiment is misguided and useless in thinking that sub- and luminal velocity electromagnetic radiation is monitorable for intelligent alien communications - no advanced technoculture would limit itself to such techniques and supercede this with scalar transmission.

"That electrical energy can be economically transmitted without wires to any terrestrial distance, I have unmistakably established in numerous observations, experiments and measurements, qualitative and quantitative. These have demonstrated that it is practicable to distribute power from a central plant in unlimited amounts, with a loss not exceeding a small fraction of one per cent, in the transmission, even to the greatest distance, twelve thousand miles to the opposite end of the globe." Nikola Tesla

Check out scientist Eric Dollard's practical demos on Utube
Tachyon8491
2 / 5 (4) Jun 26, 2012
In an article Tesla wrote for the Electrical World in 1921, he states: "...there are countless worlds such as ours in the universeplanets revolving around their suns... ."

In an interview with Time magazine he said, "I think that nothing can be more important than interplanetary communication. It will certainly come someday, and the certitude that there are other human beings in the universe, working, suffering, struggling, like ourselves, will produce a magic effect on mankind and will form the foundation of a universal brotherhood that will last as long as humanity itself." "Tesla at 75," Time July 20, 1931
TheGhostofOtto1923
4.4 / 5 (13) Jun 26, 2012
who morphs into his sock puppets and back again.
Sorry, I usually only use otto except for comedic effect. There are several people here who are tired of your flooding crap and say so repeatedly.
Sad, sad Blotto the clown...doesn't believe in possible intelligent life elsewhere in the universe.
Sure I do. But they are not the 100 ft tall glass-headed martian somnambulents that you thought you (pirouette/jeannie) saw in the NASA pics.
He seems to live only to falsely attack me
Tell us how Picts and Druids could have built Stonehenge. Substantiate your claims that affirmative action mandates quotas and firing people. Explain how gyroscopes can produce gravity or how a spaceplane could possibly trap and transport orbital antimatter. And address all those other cowpies you have dropped here as well. Or STFU.
who only rely on Wikipedia and YouTube
-Or your personal favorite - buzzle??
http://www.buzzle...-39.html
TheGhostofOtto1923
4 / 5 (12) Jun 26, 2012
To be honest, I didn't notice the difference. I believe one is in Arecibo, PR, but the pic says ATA.
Because you wouldnt KNOW the difference unless someone indicated that there WAS a difference you posturing lying phony.
I only want to discuss the topic with intelligent people.
Intelligent people typically resent your wanton thoughtless nonsense. As a nurse please give your professional explanation for why you think bloodletting can treat leukemia, as you claimed when you first showed up? You could start here:
http://articles.l...he-31093
PussyCat_Eyes
2.3 / 5 (3) Jun 26, 2012
ROFLOL...You idiotthat was Tom_Hennessy who suggested bloodletting for leukemia, not me. Once again you have misquoted a discussion between me and others and twisted words to further your insane and false accusations. You prove time and time again that you lack understanding of what was said in discussions, but that's nothing new. You're just a miserable asshole who floods and ruins threads with your stupidity, and you seem proud of it.

http://medicalxpr...cer.html

http://medicalxpr...ger.html
In THIS thread, your dimwit comments were removed by admin. I have to wonder why your handlers at the mental institution where you reside allow you to verbally assault innocent people in this website...unless they believe it will cure your mental problems somehow.
PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (1) Jun 26, 2012
I have no idea who your (pirouette/jeannie) are. Neither am I aware of anyone named Ritchie that you keep insisting on.
Other than the threads I just submitted, I will NOT go off topic. You wouldn't understand a word I say anyway.
PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (1) Jun 26, 2012
Just to bring things back down to Earth, did anybody else happen to note that the title photo is NOT the ATA, but seems to be part of the VLA, or are we all too focused on the stars to see what is not in front of our eyes?
http://en.wikiped...pe_Array
- Ibuz

Like I said, I didn't notice the picture much, and anyway I was more familiar with the Arrecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico which is a part of the world-wide Very Large Baseline Array. Here's a wiki link

http://en.wikiped...ne_Array
PhotonX
1 / 5 (1) Jun 27, 2012
I choose SETI as the most forward-looking and progressive agency who should also take a closer look at planets in our own solar system.
You can't seriously think there is intelligent life on other Solar System planets, do you? Other planets, yes, but Mars or Venus or Saturn? Really?

If the same resources spent on SETI were instead redirected towards the search for radical new propulsion systems...
Virtually nothing is spent on SETI, the money would be a drop in the bucket anywhere else.
What we would need are very long line (space based) radio telescopes to check for planets and their atmospheric compositions...
Absolutely.

PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (1) Jun 27, 2012
I choose SETI as the most forward-looking and progressive agency who should also take a closer look at planets in our own solar system.
You can't seriously think there is intelligent life on other Solar System planets, do you? Other planets, yes, but Mars or Venus or Saturn? Really?

- PhotonX

But why not? So far, NASA hasn't equipped any Mars rovers with cameras to record movement. IF there are intelligent life forms on Mars or Jupiter (Venus is probably too hot), they would have to be capable of motion similar to us. A lot of people in NASA and other agencies couldn't understand why such cameras with built-in motion detectors were not included with the rovers. The official explanation was that there wasn't enough room for it. It's the same with Curiosity, no room supposedly. If intelligent life are there, we will never see them...at least, not the general public. Private space firms may be forward looking enough to equip their own craft with such cameras in future.
PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (1) Jun 27, 2012
SETI is forward looking because it seeks intelligent life, not microbes. Valik said "WE KNOW there are many intelligent beings and old civilizations out there, between trillion of stars and billions of galaxies, whatever their forms, pure energy, wild quantum spores, tall and slim, translucency... what we do not know is if there is any intelligent life ON EARTH."
Valik is right, that intelligence doesn't necessarily have to come in human form, nor does it have to subsist on the same things we do. We only insist that they must be more like us because what is most familiar is less threatening and/or frightening. If an intelligent life form has an appearance similar to a 4 foot tall translucent paramecium, we might not find that too pleasing...especially if they subsist on carbon-based protoplasm. But SETI should keep searching in whatever means possible, no matter how long it takes. Some people think space aliens are here already and walking among us. If that's the case, wilkommen Sie.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (2) Jun 27, 2012
I think we often also forget that intelligence/technology/tool use are just SOME useful properties for an organism to have once life develops (much like speed, or toxins or the ability to survive harsh conditions by forming spores, ...)
They do not seem to be THE properties towards which life gravitates. Note that the dinosaurs were the dominant species for over 130 MILLION years without going for intelligence in any big way. That's about 1300 times longer than human intelligence has been around (!)
So currently it looks like intelligence isn't something that 'eventually inevitably' develops but rather a freak branch off of the evolutionary tree.
Life bearing planets may well go through their entire existence without a smidgeon of intelligence showing up.
TheGhostofOtto1923
4.2 / 5 (15) Jun 27, 2012
twisted words to further your insane and false accusations.
Hey thanks for the link to your bullshit. Of bloodletting, p/r/r/p the professional opines:
If, as you seem to suspect, the child has a preponderance of red cells and iron, then it may be possible to do some blood-letting as in venipuncture.
-And I can't imagine a real nurse agreeing that such a thing made sense, unless they happened to find it on wiki or buzzle.
I don't know if they would do that because of her age and lesser volume of blood compared to an adult.
So in other words not for kids but ok for adults? Is that your professional opinion?

Every one of your nonsense claims can and will be exposed in similar fashion. As when you look up arecibo and then pretend this makes you know what you are talking about.
You can't seriously think there is intelligent life on other Solar System planets, do you?
P/r/r/p believes in translucent Martians. A common theme amongst all the sockpuppets.
TheGhostofOtto1923
4.2 / 5 (15) Jun 27, 2012
As for this prime bullshit:
As NASA concentrates only on bacteria and the geology on other planets, SETI looks for intelligent life.
As usual the Internet knows better.
http://trs-new.jp...0880.pdf

-Keep making things up you dumbass.
PhotonX
1 / 5 (1) Jun 28, 2012
ON TOPIC: Perhaps part of my earlier comment was premature.
.
Arguably certain Earth-born cetaceans (e.g. dolphins, whales), and some mollusks (e.g. octopus, cuttlefish, squid) MAY be sapient or at least could be, given the right circumstances. With the strong possibility of water oceans on several extraterrestrial solar system bodies (e.g. Europa, Enceladus, Titan), who am I to say that intelligent life forms aren't flourishing there? And it's unlikely(?) but not impossible for floating air bags might be found in the gas giants themselves. I'm skeptical that 'terrestrial' intelligences inhabit Mars or Venus or Titan, but there I'm perhaps biased, interpreting 'intelligent' to mean 'technological', expecting signs of cities or other structures, but certainly homo sapiens was full-blown sapient before any signs of US would have been visible from space on any but the highest resolution.
.
So, I'm retracting that piece my previous comment, if that's okay.
PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (1) Jun 28, 2012
I have no knowledge of "translucent martians". I mentioned "translucent 4 foot tall paramecium". Blotto still has a hard time comprehending what was said by me in this and other threads. So sad, isn't it?

Duly noted, PhotonX
PussyCat_Eyes
1 / 5 (1) Jun 28, 2012
PhotonX...in your opinion...do you think that there's a possibility that Xtraterrestrials are already here on earth? I have no idea if it's possible or that there might be intelligent XT on Venus, Mars, or the gas planets and moons. But it would be fun to find out in our lifetimes, wouldn't it?
TheGhostofOtto1923
4.4 / 5 (14) Jun 28, 2012
I have no knowledge of "translucent martians". I mentioned "translucent 4 foot tall paramecium". Blotto still has a hard time comprehending what was said by me in this and other threads. So sad, isn't it?
I don't know, in this thread you posted some pretty outrageous bullshit:
http://phys.org/n...ain.html

-But you always do that. And as you seem to be a compulsive liar we will have to go on the evidence and conclude that you are the pirouette person who deposited the notion of 1000 ft tall glass-headed Martians some time ago. In part because:
I have no idea if it's possible or that there might be intelligent XT on Venus, Mars, or the gas planets and moons. But it would be fun to find out in our lifetimes, wouldn't it?
-You say shit like this.

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