42,000-year-old baby mammoth on show in Hong Kong

Apr 11, 2012
The carcass of the world's most well-preserved baby mammoth, named Lyuba, is displayed in Hong Kong. Lyuba, whose carcass is 42 thousand years old was found by a reindeer herder in Yamal Peninsula in Russia on 2007.

The world's best-preserved mammoth, buried about 42,000 years ago, will go on display in Hong Kong this week, the organiser of its first exhibition in Asia said Wednesday.

Discovered in the of Russia's Yamal Peninsula in 2007 by a reindeer herder, the female baby mammoth named Lyuba remained almost fully intact with organs and eyelashes preserved.

Only her toenails, part of her tail, right ear and were missing.

Traces of her mother's milk were even found in Lyuba's stomach, said the IFC mall, the city's posh harbourfront shopping centre, which will showcase the animal for a month from Thursday.

Lyuba, which means "love" in Russian, has previously toured North America.

Scientists have said they believe the ice-age was only a few months old when she probably drowned in a mudslide, which "pickled" her in near-perfect condition.

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WorldJunkie
3 / 5 (2) Apr 11, 2012
"Lyuba" doesn't mean "love" in Russian. " Lyubov' " does, and it can also be a female name. "Lyuba" is a diminutive of it, but only in its name, not noun, context.
Burnerjack
not rated yet Apr 11, 2012
Can it be cloned?

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