Demonstration of ultra-high speed piezoelectric thin film with nanodomain structure

Dec 22, 2011

The Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, the National Institute for Materials Science, and Kyoto University confirmed for the first time in the world that it is possible to achieve ultra-high speed switching in a time of 200 nanoseconds with a new piezoelectric thin film which possesses micro regions called “nanodomains.” The new material is expected to enable higher speeds in operation changes (switching).

Piezoelectric utilize the property of structural change in response to electrical signals, and are used as a power source for micro devices (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems, MEMS) in ink jet printers. However, switching time cannot be adequately controlled with the current generation of piezoelectric thin films. If it is possible to realize high speed switching, expansion to industrial applications and development of higher performance products can be expected.

Therefore, using the high brightness synchrotron radiation of ’s large-scale facility SPring-8, this research group investigated the nanodomain structural changes that occur when an electrical field is applied at high speed to a ferroelectric thin film, which is one type of piezoelectric. As a result, the group succeeded in confirming for the first time in the world that the nanodomain crystal orientation of this thin film changes in a time of 2/10 millionths of a second, or 200 nanoseconds (200 ns).

This result, which showed the possibility of controlling piezoelectric thin films at the nanosecond order of 200ns, will make a major contribution to the development of high performance products by realizing higher speeds in MEMS using piezoelectric thin films. As examples, in ink jet printers, achievement of higher treatment speeds in MEMS, which control ink coating, will enable fine printing with a smaller quantity of ink than the conventional technology, and in automotive engines, higher MEMS speeds can be expected to contribute to improved fuel economy and reduced exhaust gas by application of nanodomain structures to ceramic parts which control fuel use efficiency.

This work was published on November 4 in Applied Physics Letters and has also been newly selected as a noteworthy paper in the Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science and Technology.

Explore further: In-situ nanoindentation study of phase transformation in magnetic shape memory alloys

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Modern ceramics help advance technology

May 08, 2008

Many important electronic devices used by people today would be impossible without the use of ceramics. A new study published in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society illustrates the use of ceramic materials in the ...

Giant piezoelectric effect to improve MEMS devices

Dec 02, 2011

Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Materials Research Institute at Penn State are part of a multidisciplinary team of researchers from universities and national laboratories ...

Nanotechnology pushes battery life to eternity

Jun 21, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A simple tap from your finger may be enough to charge your portable device thanks to a discovery made at RMIT University and Australian National University.

Lead-free piezoelectric materials of the future

Sep 14, 2010

Piezoelectric materials have fantastic properties: squeeze them and they generate an electrical field. And vice-versa, they contract or expand when jolted with an electrical pulse. With a name derived from the Greek word ...

Recommended for you

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin

9 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Ever-shrinking electronic devices could get down to atomic dimensions with the help of transition metal oxides, a class of materials that seems to have it all: superconductivity, magnetoresistance ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin

(Phys.org) —Ever-shrinking electronic devices could get down to atomic dimensions with the help of transition metal oxides, a class of materials that seems to have it all: superconductivity, magnetoresistance ...

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair

A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team led by Ludwik Leibler from the Laboratoire Matière Molle et Chimie (CNRS/ESPCI Paris Tech) and Didier Letourneur ...