Mega beats Mimi for world's biggest virus

Oct 10, 2011
A virus found in the sea off Chile is the biggest in the world, harbouring more than 1,000 genes, surprised scientists reported on Monday.

A virus found in the sea off Chile is the biggest in the world, harbouring more than 1,000 genes, surprised scientists reported on Monday.

The genome of Megavirus chilensis is 6.5 percent bigger than the of the previous virus record-holder, Mimivirus, isolated in 2003.

Viruses differ from bacteria in that they are usually far smaller and cannot reproduce on their own, needing to penetrate a host cell in which to replicate.

But M. chilensis is such a giant that it surpasses many bacteria in size and is genetically the most complex ever described.

It was taken from sea water sample closed to the shore of Las Cruces, Chile. Its is unknown.

DNA viruses include pox viruses and herpes viruses, but M. chilensis "doesn't seem to be harmful for humans," said Jean-Michel Claverie, of France's National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS).

The study appears in a US journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

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More information: "A distant Mimivirus relative with a larger genome highlights the fundamental features of Megaviridae," by Defne Arslan, Matthieu Legendre, Virginie Seltzer, Chantal Abergel, and Jean-Michel Claverie, PNAS.

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pokerdice1
not rated yet Oct 10, 2011
Ahhhh! I just stepped on one!

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