Celebrity New York hawk dashes chick hopes: expert

May 04, 2011
New York City Parks and Recreation Commissioner Adrian Benepe hold a red-tailed hawk before releasing it in New York's Central Park 2009. One of New York's most closely watched celebrities -- a red-tailed hawk nesting on a Manhattan high rise -- has dashed hopes that three eggs she's been tending will hatch.

One of New York's most closely watched celebrities -- a red-tailed hawk nesting on a Manhattan high rise -- has dashed hopes that three eggs she's been tending will hatch.

The hawk, dubbed Violet, and her mate Bobby have been fussing over the three eggs laid in a nest on a ledge outside the 12th floor office of the president of New York University.

The young family's every move has been watched through the Hawk Cam set up by The New York Times and followed by enthusiastic well-wishers.

But Wednesday, the Times reported: "Barring a miracle, there will be no baby hawks."

"No chance," veteran hawk breeder John Blakeman told the Times.

The hatching window of about 32-35 days has expired and although Violet endeared herself to viewers with her meticulous nesting methods, she and Bobby were probably just too inexperienced at the outset, Blakeman said. "The pair just may have been inept lovers."

New York's concrete jungle is the unlikely haven for a number of wild media stars.

The love life of another red-tailed hawk, known as Pale Male, has been a long-running local media staple.

Last year an adventurous coyote sparked pandemonium after straying into Central Park and in March an Egyptian cobra made headlines after escaping in the .

Cam can be viewed at: http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/29/hawk-cam-updates-from-the-nest/

Despite the disappointing prognosis from experts, Violet was still sitting on her speckled eggs.

Explore further: Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

HAWK-I takes off

Aug 23, 2007

Europe's flagship ground-based astronomical facility, the ESO VLT, has been equipped with a new 'eye' to study the Universe. Working in the near-infrared, the new instrument - dubbed HAWK-I - covers about ...

Sony buys Hawk-Eye sports ball tracking firm

Mar 08, 2011

Japanese technology and entertainment giant Sony has bought Hawk-Eye, the British-based firm whose computer systems assist umpires and track the path of balls in sports such as tennis and cricket.

'Falcon-cam' captures life in UB nest

Apr 12, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new University at Buffalo Web camera is capturing life in a peregrine falcon nest on the UB South Campus in Buffalo, where, for the second consecutive year, a female has laid her eggs.

Birds Of A Feather Attack Together

May 04, 2010

Last summer, physicist Suzanne Amador Kane at Haverford College in Pennsylvania set up an experiment looking at how flocks of small birds on her campus -- swallows -- defend themselves from predators by ganging ...

Keeping an eye on the nest

Mar 11, 2010

You can catch the hatch of the first egg in the tree-top bald eagle nest at Norfolk Botanical Garden in southeastern Virginia via the garden's special Web cam -- norfolkbotanicalgarden.org.

Recommended for you

Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

Apr 18, 2014

(Phys.org) —The incident was captured by Dr Bruna Bezerra and colleagues in the Atlantic Forest in the Northeast of Brazil.  Dr Bezerra is a Research Associate at the University of Bristol and a Professor ...

Orchid named after UC Riverside researcher

Apr 17, 2014

One day about eight years ago, Katia Silvera, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Riverside, and her father were on a field trip in a mountainous area in central Panama when they stumbled ...

In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises

Apr 17, 2014

Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but re ...

Fear of the cuckoo mafia

Apr 17, 2014

If a restaurant owner fails to pay the protection money demanded of him, he can expect his premises to be trashed. Warnings like these are seldom required, however, as fear of the consequences is enough to ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gunslingor1
not rated yet May 04, 2011
How the hell would a coyote make it into central park? From the zoo? It would have had to travel many miles through city streets, wtf?
wiyosaya
not rated yet May 04, 2011
How the hell would a coyote make it into central park? From the zoo? It would have had to travel many miles through city streets, wtf?

This is not all that uncommon these days.

More news stories

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.