Ride along with Rhea

Apr 28, 2011 By Jason Major
Animation made from raw Cassini image data acquired April 25, 2011. Credit: NASA / JPL / Space Science Institute

Assembled from 29 raw images taken by the Cassini orbiter on Monday, April 25, this animation brings us along an orbital ride with Rhea as it crosses Saturn’s nighttime face, the planet’s shadow cast across the ringplane. Sister moons Dione and Tethys travel the opposite lane in the background, eventually appearing to sink into Saturn’s atmosphere.

The exposure varies slightly from frame to frame due to the fact that they are not all taken with the same color channel filter.

(1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles, wide), Dione (1,123 kilometers, or 698 miles wide) and Tethys (1,066 kilometers, or 662 miles wide) are all very similar in composition and appearance. The moons are composed mostly of water ice and rock, each covered in craters of all sizes and crisscrossed by gouges, scarps and chasms. All three are tidally locked with , showing the same face to their parent planet in the same way that the Moon does with Earth.

The Cassini spacecraft was 2,227,878 km (1,384,339 miles) from Rhea when the images were taken.

(The original images have not been validated or calibrated. Validated/calibrated images will be archived with the NASA Planetary Data System in 2012.)

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LKD
not rated yet Apr 28, 2011
Interesting that the shadow on the horizon on Rhea doesn't change. Can someone explain that a little for me? Is it because the satellite is moving to give the false impression that the moon is orbiting quickly?