Feds deploy more radiation monitors in western US

Mar 16, 2011

(AP) -- Federal environmental regulators say they are adding more radiation monitors in the western United States and Pacific territories as concerns rise over exposure from damaged nuclear plants in Japan.

The already monitors radiation throughout the area as part of its RadNet system, which measures levels in air, drinking water, milk and rain.

The additional monitors are in response to the ongoing nuclear crisis in Japan, where emergency workers are attempting to cool overheated reactors damaged by last week's magnitude-9.0 and .

Officials with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission say they do not expect harmful radiation levels to reach the U.S. from Japan.

The EPA says data from the monitors are available on its website for coastal states, Hawaii, Guam and American Samoa.

Explore further: 'Shocking' underground water loss in US drought

More information: U.S. EPA's radiation monitoring data: http://www.epa.gov/radiation/

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ormondotvos
5 / 5 (1) Mar 16, 2011
However, in certain circumstances, excessive consumption of iodine can actually inhibit the synthesis of thyroid hormones, thereby leading to the development of goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland) and hypothyroidism. Excessive iodine intake may also cause hyperthyroidism, thyroid papillary cancer, and/or iodermia (a serious skin reaction).
In an attempt to prevent these symptoms of iodine toxicity, the Institute of Medicine established the following Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (TUL) for iodine:
1-3 years: 900 mcg
4-8 years: 300 mcg
9-13 years: 600 mcg
14-18 years: 900 mcg
19 years and older: 1,100 mcg
Pregnant women 14-18 years: 900 mcg
Pregnant women 19 years and older: 1,100 mcg
Lactating women 14-18 years: 900 mcg
ormondotvos
5 / 5 (1) Mar 16, 2011
Maximum recommended dose of iodine is 1.1 MILLIGRAMS. The typical pill being pushed is 50 MILLIGRAMS. Since people in fear and panic will overdose, will we then see more sickness and death from potassium iodide than from radiation effects?

Fear is the mind-killer
omatumr
2 / 5 (2) Mar 16, 2011
Congratulations, EPA!

It is gratifying to see EPA act on behalf of the people, instead of acting on behalf of politicians and world leaders who have in the recent past created imaginary dangers for their own purposes.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel