NASA: All looking good for Thursday shuttle launch

Feb 22, 2011 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
STS-133 crew members, from left, Mission Specialists Nicole Stott, Michael Barratt, Steve Bowen, Alvin Drew, Pilot Eric Boe, and Commander Steve Lindsey pose for a photo after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Sunday, Feb. 20, 2011. The space shuttle Discovery, and her crew of six astronauts, is scheduled to lift off Thursday afternoon on an 11-day mission to the international space station. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

(AP) -- NASA is just two days out from sending space shuttle Discovery on its final voyage after a nearly four-month delay.

Officials said Tuesday the countdown is going well. What's more, there's an 80 percent chance of good flying weather Thursday. Launch time is 4:50 p.m.

This will be the 39th flight for NASA's oldest surviving shuttle. Discovery first rocketed into orbit in 1984. This time, Discovery is headed back to the . It will drop off a humanoid robot as well as an oversize closet full of space station supplies.

Discovery should have been finished flying by now. cracks, however, caused the four-month delay. NASA test director Steve Payne says the repaired tank is stronger than ever.

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