Rare black rhino born at US zoo

Jan 26, 2011
This undated handout image, released by the St. Louis Zoo in St. Louis, Missouri shows a black rhinoceros calf and its mother Kati Rain snuggling in their enclosure at the Saint Louis Zoo. The calf was born to first-time parents, Kati Rain and father Ajabu (pronounced ah-JAH-boo), at the zoo on January 14, 2011.

A rare black rhino calf was born to first-time parents at the St Louis, Missouri zoo, officials said.

Weighing in at just over 55 kilos (120 pounds), "the little male is nursing well and being cared for by his mother," the zoo said in a press release Tuesday.

Black are a critically endangered species after being poached nearly to between 1970 and 1992.

Intensive anti-poaching efforts have seen the wild population in Africa rise from about 2,300 in 1993 to 4,240 today, according to the International Rhino Foundation.

The Saint Louis Zoo is among 37 institutions in North America working to breed rhinos in captivity.

A name has not yet been chosen for the calf, the first to be born at the in 20 years.

Mother Kati Rain and father Ajabu, both six, arrived in St. Louis in 2007 after being transferred from zoos in Kansas and California.

The mother and calf -- who was born January 14 -- are bonding in their off-display barn and will move into their outdoor habitat when the weather turns warmer.

Explore further: Research shows impact of BMR on brain size in fish

Related Stories

Endangered rhinos return to wild

Dec 11, 2009

A Czech zoo is to transfer four endangered Northern White rhinos to a Kenyan reserve in a last-ditch attempt to ensure the survival of the species.

Elderly Malaysian rhino enlisted in breeding attempt

Sep 23, 2010

Malaysian wildlife officials on Borneo island said Thursday they will try to artificially inseminate an elderly female rhinoceros in a bid to revive one of the world's most endangered species.

Recommended for you

Research shows impact of BMR on brain size in fish

Apr 24, 2015

A commonly used term to describe nutritional needs and energy expenditure in humans – basal metabolic rate – could also be used to give insight into brain size of ocean fish, according to new research by Dr Teresa Iglesias ...

Why do animals fight members of other species?

Apr 23, 2015

Why do animals fight with members of other species? A nine-year study by UCLA biologists says the reason often has to do with "obtaining priority access to females" in the area.

Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters

Apr 23, 2015

Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Pyle
not rated yet Jan 26, 2011
DNA would be proud.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.