Researchers Find Fingerprints in Murder Case

December 8, 2008

( -- A pioneering forensic scientist at Northamptonshire Police and the University of Leicester has helped detectives move a step closer to solving a murder case.

Dr John Bond, Scientific Support Manager at Northamptonshire Police and Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Leicester Forensic Research Centre, is tackling a murder case on America’s Most Wanted list.

Using a revolutionary new forensic technique, Dr Bond has found fingerprints on bullet casings used in the murder.

Bullet casings from the shooting – which took place in Texas on December 9 2007 – have been analysed by Dr Bond using a method that enables scientists to visualise fingerprints even after the print itself has been removed.

The casings were brought to the UK by Detective Tony Roten from the Crimes Against Persons Section – CID, North Richland Hills Police, Texas.

Detective Roten said: “We are very pleased with Dr Bond’s work.

“There appears to be good fingerprints on one of the casings.”

Chris King, a detective from Kingsland Police Department, Georgia, recently visited the Force to see whether Dr Bond could help with a 10-year old unsolved double homicide case.

The initial findings – which identified a partial print – have enabled US officers to eliminate suspects in the case.

And Dr Bond has been receiving calls from police forces from the UK and across the Atlantic asking for help with unsolved cases.

Dr Bond said: “I have now examined in excess of 100 shell casings in the past couple of months.

“This current case for Detective Roten would appear to be the best print we have so far been able to enhance.

“We are very pleased that we have been able to help Detective Roten with this inquiry.”

Provided by University of Leicester

Explore further: Technology can identify the hidden properties of receipts containing fingerprint deposits

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