Seniors, minorities to have largest impact on tomorrow's America

April 23, 2008

The demographic patterns of older Americans and certain ethnic groups will have greater effects on the country's socioeconomic outlook than previously thought, according to the latest issue of Public Policy & Aging Report (PPAR). In particular, the Baby Boomer generation and residents of Hispanic and Asian backgrounds will have a noticeable impact as their populations swell.

The entire issue is authored by cutting-edge demographer William H. Frey. He is currently a senior fellow with Metropolitan Studies Program at the Brookings Institution and is a research professor at the University of Michigan and a senior fellow of the Milken Institute in Santa Monica, CA.

His research upends traditional notions of how and where Americans spend their later years. In states where senior populations will grow fastest over the next 35 years, "aging in place" rather than migration will drive this growth. In Georgia, for example, the number of residents age 65+ will increase by more than 40 percent from 2010 to 2020 due to the aging of existing residents, versus less than three percent due to migration.

Frey's examination of minorities finds Hispanics and Asian immigrants having a profound effect on the entire country, especially in certain regions. Until recently, these populations were highly clustered in a few big metropolitan areas. But statistics show that there has been a dispersal of immigrants away from the traditional magnets of Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and Miami to new destinations in all parts of the country.

Source: The Gerontological Society of America

Explore further: Rethinking the computer game as a teaching tool

Related Stories

Rethinking the computer game as a teaching tool

August 23, 2015

Christian Varona didn't rely on textbooks and slideshows to learn history. When it came to studying for daunting Advanced Placement tests, he didn't turn to a tutor, either.

Cool paint job could blow away air con costs

July 20, 2015

A cool discovery from QUT researchers has found that a special roof coating could bring Queenslanders relief from sweltering summers as well as lower electricity bills.

High-tech sensors help kids keep eye on aging parents

May 5, 2015

Each time 81-year-old Bill Dworsky or his 80-year-old wife Dorothy opens the refrigerator, closes the bathroom door or lifts the lid on a pill container, tiny sensors in their San Francisco home make notes on a digital logbook.

Traffic emissions may pollute one in three Canadian homes

April 21, 2015

A trio of recently published studies from a team of University of Toronto engineers has found that air pollution could be spreading up to three times farther than thought—contributing to varying levels of air quality across ...

Recommended for you

Amateur paleontologist finds rare fossil of fish in Arizona

September 3, 2015

Growing up, Stephanie Leco often would dig in her backyard and imagine finding fossils of a tyrannosaurus rex. She was fascinated with the idea of holding something in her hand that was millions of years old and would give ...

X-rays reveal fossil secrets

September 3, 2015

A sophisticated imaging technique has allowed scientists to virtually peer inside a 10-million-year-old sea urchin, uncovering a treasure trove of hidden fossils.

Early human diet explains our eating habits

August 31, 2015

Much attention is being given to what people ate in the distant past as a guide to what we should eat today. Advocates of the claimed palaeodiet recommend that we should avoid carbohydrates and load our plates with red meat ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.