Payload is loaded into shuttle Discovery

October 4, 2007

The U.S. space agency said the payload for the next mission to the International Space Station has been installed in space shuttle Discovery's cargo bay.

The payload, including the Italian-built Harmony module, was installed in the space shuttle Wednesday at Launch Pad 39A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The U.S. module will serve as the future connecting point between the U.S. Destiny lab, the European Space Agency's Columbus module and the Japanese Kibo module.

The seven STS-120 crew members are to arrive Sunday in Florida for next week's "dress rehearsal" for the scheduled Oct. 23 launch.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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