NASA awards Juno Jupiter mission contract

October 4, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has picked Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services of Littleton, Colo., for the Juno mission to Jupiter.

The $190 million contract includes launch services for an Atlas V model 551 rocket, payload processing, launch vehicle integration and associated tracking, data and telemetry support. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in August 2011 on an interplanetary trajectory to Jupiter.

Juno is to arrive at Jupiter in August 2016. Using remote sensing and gravity measurements, the spacecraft will characterize Jupiter's interior, atmosphere and polar magnetosphere with the primary science goal of understanding the planet's origin and evolution.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Renowned scientist who helped lead mission to Jupiter dies

Related Stories

Why we need more than one mission to Mars

December 5, 2014

After a 24-hour delay due to bad weather, the first test launch of the Orion spacecraft by NASA is underway with the ultimate goal of putting human beings on Mars.

How hostile is space?

August 6, 2014

Space may seem calm, but it is a more hostile environment than that on Earth. Invisible radiation is a big problem for space enthusiasts and scientific instruments. Substituting electronic devices to do human tasks reduces ...

Recommended for you

Distant planet's interior chemistry may differ from our own

September 1, 2015

As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth. ...

New Horizons team selects potential Kuiper Belt flyby target

August 29, 2015

NASA has selected the potential next destination for the New Horizons mission to visit after its historic July 14 flyby of the Pluto system. The destination is a small Kuiper Belt object (KBO) known as 2014 MU69 that orbits ...

Interstellar seeds could create oases of life

August 27, 2015

We only have one example of a planet with life: Earth. But within the next generation, it should become possible to detect signs of life on planets orbiting distant stars. If we find alien life, new questions will arise. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.