Johns Hopkins leads in research spending

February 21, 2007

Johns Hopkins University was the fiscal 2005 leader in total research and development spending among all U.S. academic institutions, a report said.

Researchers at the Baltimore, Md.-based, school performed $1.44 billion in science, medical and engineering research during fiscal year 2005, which started Oct. 1, 2005, and ended Sept. 30, 2006.

The National Science Foundation said that makes Johns Hopkins the leading U.S. academic institution in total research and development spending for the 27th consecutive year.

The university also ranked first on the NSF's separate list of federally funded research and development, spending $1.277 billion during fiscal 2005 on research supported by such agencies as the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Department of Defense.

The University of Michigan was second in total R&D spending at $808 million. The University of Washington ranked second in federally financed R & D at $606 million.

Behind the University of Michigan in total research expenditure is the University of Wisconsin-Madison with $798 million and the University of California-Los Angeles at $785 million. Completing the top five, with $754 million, is the University of California-San Francisco.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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