Celebrity endorsement efficacy questioned

February 28, 2007

British and Swiss researchers have found advertisements featuring celebrity endorsements might be less effective than those featuring ordinary people.

Scientists at the University of Bath and the University of St. Gallen say that's because keeping up with the Joneses, rather than with famous people, is the main motivation behind many people's choice of which products to buy.

The researchers showed 298 undergraduates a magazine ad for a digital camera. Some ads included an endorsement by a fictional student who said the camera was "hot," while other ads included an invented testimonial from a German celebrity.

"Our research questions whether celebrities are the best way to sell products," said Professor Brett Martin of the University of Bath. "This is because many people ... like to make sure their product is fashionable and trendy among people who resemble them, rather than approved by celebrities."

But Martin added, "What is also important in our study is that people who aren't bothered about having the trendiest goods pay more attention to the technical details of a product and ignore endorsements by anyone, celebrity or not, and advertisers should bear that in mind, too."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Family drug courts with parenting programs yield better reunification rates, researchers say

Related Stories

After 100 years, Einstein's theory stands test of time

October 20, 2015

Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity is about to celebrate its 100th anniversary, and his revolutionary hypothesis has withstood the test of time, despite numerous expert attempts to find flaws.

The cognitive science of survey methodology

October 20, 2015

The United Nations Statistical Commission celebrates the fifth annual World Statistics Day today. Over 60 countries have joined together to coordinate activities based on the theme of "Better data. Better lives." The National ...

Recommended for you

Four pre-Inca tombs found in Peru's Lima

November 27, 2015

Archaeologists in Peru have found four tombs that are more than 1,000 years old in a pyramid-shaped cemetery that now sits in the middle of a residential neighborhood in Lima, experts said.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.