Space shuttle launch rescheduled

January 29, 2007

NASA says the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis to the International Space Station on mission STS-117 will occur March 15 -- one day earlier than planned.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida said the orbiter is scheduled to move to the Vehicle Assembly Building Feb. 7 for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boosters.

NASA said the canister that holds the space station's S3/S4 solar arrays has been "fit tested" and is to be transported to the pad Feb. 18.

The crew of that shuttle flight -- STS-117 -- will continue constructing the space station, installing a new truss segment, retracting a set of existing solar arrays and unfolding a new set on the starboard side of the station.

The team will be commanded by Frederick Sturckow, a veteran of two shuttle missions, while Lee Archambault will be making his first flight as the shuttle's pilot. Astronauts James Reilly and Patrick Forrester will be returning to the station, with Steven Swanson and John Olivas making their first flight into space.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Walk the line: NASA studies physical performance after spaceflight

Related Stories

Fortifying computer chips for space travel

September 7, 2015

Space is cold, dark, and lonely. Deadly, too, if any one of a million things goes wrong on your spaceship. It's certainly no place for a computer chip to fail, which can happen due to the abundance of radiation bombarding ...

Recommended for you

NASA selects investigations for future key planetary mission

October 1, 2015

NASA has selected five science investigations for refinement during the next year as a first step in choosing one or two missions for flight opportunities as early as 2020. Three of those chosen have ties to NASA's Jet Propulsion ...

Dawn team shares new maps and insights about Ceres

October 1, 2015

Mysteries and insights about Ceres are being discussed this week at the European Planetary Science Conference in Nantes, France. NASA's Dawn spacecraft is providing scientists with tantalizing views and other data about the ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.