Shuttle countdown to begin Thursday

August 21, 2006

NASA is set to begin the countdown for the Florida launch of the space shuttle Atlantis' mission to the International Space Station at 6 p.m. EDT Thursday.

The flight will mark resumption of ISS construction, started in 1998 but halted in 2003 after the loss of space shuttle Columbia and the death of its crew.

The NASA Kennedy Space Center launch team will conduct the countdown that includes 27 hours, 24 minutes of built-in hold time leading to a preferred launch time at 4:30 p.m. Sunday. The launch window for that day extends an additional five minutes.

The mission -- the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for Atlantis and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station -- is to last 11 days, with a landing at Kennedy about 12:02 p.m. EDT Sept. 7.

The STS-115 crew is Commander Brent Jett, pilot Chris Ferguson, and mission specialists Joe Tanner, Dan Burbank, Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper and Canadian astronaut Steve MacLean.

They are to, among other things, deliver and install a 17.5-ton integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Amazon wants air space for delivery drones

Related Stories

Federal officials examine probable cause of spaceship crash

July 28, 2015

The National Transportation Safety Board is considering what caused a Virgin Galactic spaceship to break apart over the Mojave Desert during a test flight 10 months ago, killing the co-pilot and seriously injuring the pilot.

Recommended for you

First detection of lithium from an exploding star

July 29, 2015

The chemical element lithium has been found for the first time in material ejected by a nova. Observations of Nova Centauri 2013 made using telescopes at ESO's La Silla Observatory, and near Santiago in Chile, help to explain ...

Dense star clusters shown to be binary black hole factories

July 29, 2015

The coalescence of two black holes—a very violent and exotic event—is one of the most sought-after observations of modern astronomy. But, as these mergers emit no light of any kind, finding such elusive events has been ...

New names and insights at Ceres

July 29, 2015

Colorful new maps of Ceres, based on data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft, showcase a diverse topography, with height differences between crater bottoms and mountain peaks as great as 9 miles (15 kilometers).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.