NASA sets space shuttle Web, TV coverage

Aug 23, 2006

NASA TV and the agency's home on the Internet -- nasa.gov -- will provide pre-launch and launch-day coverage of the upcoming shuttle mission.

Space Shuttle Atlantis mission STS-115 to the International Space Station is scheduled for a Sunday launch.

A pre-launch Web cast is set for 11 a.m. EDT Saturday from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It will feature a mission overview hosted by Jon Cowart, Orbiter Project Office manager. Highlights will include an interview with STS-114 astronaut Steve Robinson who will discuss the STS-115 mission and astronaut training.

Live countdown coverage from NASA's Launch Blog begins at 10:30 a.m. EDT Sunday. Coverage features real-time updates as countdown milestones occur and streaming video clips highlighting launch preparations and liftoff.

To access the interactive features and more, go to NASA's Space Shuttle main page at
www.nasa.gov/shuttle> and follow the links provided in the right column under the "Mission Information" section.

On launch day NASA TV will begin broadcasting mission commentary at 10:30 a.m. EDT. For streaming video, scheduling and downlink information, visit:
www.nasa.gov/ntv>

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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