Japan allegedly stole huge amount of tuna

August 12, 2006

An Australian fisheries manager accused Japan of illegally taking $2 billion worth of southern bluefin tuna, damaging the commercial stock.

Richard McLoughlin, managing director of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority, told the Sydney Morning Herald, Japanese fishers and suppliers from other countries caught up to three times the Japanese quota each year for the past 20 years.

"Essentially the Japanese have stolen $2 billion worth of fish from the international community, and have been sitting in meetings for 15 years saying they are as pure as the driven snow," he said. "And it's outrageous."

The revelations have sparked concerns that other fisheries in the Pacific and Indian oceans were pilfered. Calls have been renewed for southern bluefin to be protected under international wildlife law.

Southern bluefin tuna is one of the world's most expensive fish.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Pacific bluefin tuna group puts off new moves to save fish

Related Stories

Fisheries to cut catch of endangered bluefin tuna

September 4, 2014

aThe multi-nation fisheries body that monitors most of the Pacific Ocean has recommended a substantial cut to the catch of juvenile bluefin tuna, a move conservationists say is only an initial step toward saving the dwindling ...

Fisheries nations set to discuss bluefin tuna

November 10, 2012

(AP)—After defeating a proposal in 2010 to ban the export of an endangered fish that is a key ingredient of sushi, Japan and Asian nations argued it should be left to quota-setting international fisheries bodies to bring ...

Surrogate sushi: Japan biotech for bluefin tuna

November 20, 2014

Of all the overfished fish in the seas, luscious, fatty bluefin tuna are among the most threatened. Marine scientist Goro Yamazaki, who is known in this seaside community as "Young Mr. Fish," is working to ensure the species ...

Export ban on Atlantic bluefin tuna rejected

March 18, 2010

(AP) -- Fishing nations won a victory over environmentalists Thursday when a U.S.-backed proposal to ban export of the Atlantic bluefin tuna was overwhelmingly rejected at a U.N. wildlife meeting.

Recommended for you


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.