Study: Oceans becoming more acidic

September 29, 2005

Australian scientists are warning the world's oceans are becoming more acidic as they absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystem Cooperative Research Center have been collecting and analyzing water samples from the Southern Ocean.

They have found the level of carbon dioxide in the ocean has increased 50 percent over 100 years and predict it will double again during the next 50 years, the Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported Thursday.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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