Waving, not drowning: The truth about quicksand

Scientists have given the lie to the hoary scene in Westerns in which a cowboy slowly drowns in quicksand or alternatively is cast a lifeline by a buddy and gets hauled to safety. Physicists in the Netherlands built a miniature ...

Study: Oceans becoming more acidic

Australian scientists are warning the world's oceans are becoming more acidic as they absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Deep sleep short-circuits brain’s grid of connectivity

In the human brain, cells talk to one another through the routine exchange of electrical signals. But when people fall into a deep sleep, the higher regions of the brain - regions that during waking hours are a bustling ...

First helical structure in the nano-world

Although a commonplace structure in nature, the helix remains a mystery to scientific researchers. In biology, the structure is important as DNA is helical and so does the substructure of many proteins. Since its discovery ...

Paper, plastic or digital? Technology is changing shopping

The past few years have seen the advent of new technologies that may completely change the way people shop and how retailers interact with their customers. For consumers, that could mean having a store offer recipes as soon ...

Sony continues DVD battle with Toshiba

The beginning of the end of the global DVD war may be looming, but Sony is far from conceding defeat. What's more, its business allies have remained loyal to the Japanese electronics giant despite some industry analysts expecting ...

When computers mimic us, we love what we hear

Researchers have long known that mimicry from one person to another indicates positive intentions and emotions. A new study published in the current issue of Psychological Science finds that when artificial intelligence mimics ...

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