Geophysical Research Letters

Geophysical Research Letters is a semi-monthly peer reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union that was established in 1974. The editor-in-chief is Eric Calais (Purdue University). The stated purpose of Geophysical Research Letters is rapid publication of conscise research reports that may significantly influence one or more American Geophysical Union disciplines. These particular geoscience disciplines are atmospheric sciences, solid earth, space sciences, ocean sciences, hydrology, land surface processes, and the cryosphere. GRL also publishes twelve invited reviews that cover advances achieved during the past two or three years. The target readership is the earth science community, the broader scientific community, and the general public. This journal is indexed in the following databases: According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.505, ranking it 12th out of 165 journals in the category "Geosciences, Multidisciplinary". Geophysical Research Letters was also the 5th most cited publication on climate change between 1999 and 2009.

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1974—present
Impact factor
3.505 (2010)
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Magnetic complexity begins to untangle

After a year in orbit, the three Swarm satellites have provided a first glimpse inside Earth and started to shed new light on the dynamics of the upper atmosphere – all the way from the ionosphere about ...

dateJun 23, 2015 in Space Exploration
shares136 comments 10

Heat accelerates dry in California drought

Although record low precipitation has been the main driver of one of the worst droughts in California history, abnormally high temperatures have also played an important role in amplifying its adverse ef ...

dateMay 29, 2015 in Earth Sciences
shares23 comments 0

Evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet

ULB study sheds a new light on the stability of the Antarctic ice sheet. It shows for the first time that ice rises (pinning points that keep the floating parts of ice sheets in place) are formed during the transition between ...

dateMay 27, 2015 in Earth Sciences
shares13 comments 0

Pockmarks on the lake bed

An unusual and unexpected discovery: on the floor of Lake Neuchâtel, geologists have happened upon huge underwater craters—some of the largest in the world to be found in lakes. They are not volcanic in ...

dateMay 18, 2015 in Earth Sciences
shares12 comments 0