Researchers 'iron out' graphene's wrinkles

From an electron's point of view, graphene must be a hair-raising thrill ride. For years, scientists have observed that electrons can blitz through graphene at velocities approaching the speed of light, far faster than they ...

Germs add ripples to make 'groovy' graphene

Graphene, a two-dimensional wonder-material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal chicken-wire pattern, has attracted intense interest for its phenomenal ability to conduct electricity. Now University ...

Team offers new, simpler law of complex wrinkle patterns

In a new paper, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Oxford University describe a new, more general law for predicting the wavelength of complex wrinkle patterns, including those found on curved surfaces, ...

Manipulating wrinkles could lead to graphene semiconductors

Graphene has generally been described as a two-dimensional structure—a single sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a regular structure—but the reality is not so simple. In reality, graphene can form wrinkles which make the ...

Mathematical models explain how a wrinkle becomes a crease

Wrinkles, creases and folds are everywhere in nature, from the surface of human skin to the buckled crust of the Earth. They can also be useful structures for engineers. Wrinkles in thin films, for example, can help make ...

Teaching complete evolutionary stories increases learning

Many students have difficulty understanding and explaining how evolution operates. In search of better ways to teach the subject, researchers at Michigan State University developed complete evolutionary case studies spanning ...

Science gets a grip on finger wrinkles

Getting "pruney fingers" from soaking in the bath is an evolutionary advantage, for it helps us get a better grip on objects under water, scientists suggest.

page 1 from 3