Related topics: brain · language

What do slogans at demonstrations tell us?

We see them on banners, hand-held signs, walls, clothing, bodies and faces: words are central to social protest. Every slogan—collective or individual, printed or handwritten, demand or rallying cry—conveys a political ...

Detecting paranoia among social media users

Artificial intelligence and text mining techniques can be used to detect paranoia among social media users. Specifically, work published in the International Journal of Computational Science and Engineering, has examined ...

Verbal insults trigger a 'mini slap to the face', finds new research

Hearing insults is like receiving a "mini slap in the face", regardless of the precise context the insult is made in. That is the conclusion of a new paper published in Frontiers in Communication. The researchers used electroencephalography ...

What if our history was written in our grammar?

Humans have been always on the move, creating a complex history of languages and cultural traditions dispersed over the globe. An international team under UZH's lead has now traced families of related languages over more ...

Spontaneous superconducting currents in strontium ruthenate

Superconductivity is a complete loss of electrical resistance. Superconductors are not merely very good metals: they represent a fundamentally different electronic state. In normal metals, electrons move individually, and ...

COVID-19 dominates annual list of banished words, terms

Even as vaccines are being rolled out to battle the coronavirus, wordsmiths at Lake Superior State University in Michigan's Upper Peninsula say they want to kick any trace of it from the English language.

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Word

A word is the smallest free form (an item that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content) in a language, in contrast to a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning. A word may consist of only one morpheme (e.g. cat), but a single morpheme may not be able to exist as a free form (e.g. the English plural morpheme -s).

Typically, a word will consist of a root or stem, and zero or more affixes. Words can be combined to create other units of language, such as phrases, clauses, and/or sentences. A word consisting of two or more stems joined together form a compound. A word combined with an already existing word or part of a word form a portmanteau.

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