Related topics: new zealand · marine mammal · ocean · climate change · fossil

PCB contamination in Icelandic orcas: A matter of diet

A new study from McGill University suggests that some Icelandic killer whales have very high concentrations of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) in their blubber. But it seems that other orcas from the same population have ...

Lost in the Med: Pacific grey whale ventures far from home

A young grey whale has been sighted off the southern French coast in recent days, lost in the Mediterranean and trying unsuccessfully to make it back to its natural habitat—the northern Pacific—the national network for ...

Rare blue whale washes up on Namibia beach

The carcass of an endangered blue whale, the world's largest animal, washed up on a Namibian beach on Tuesday with lesions suggesting it collided with a ship, scientists said.

NatGeo's 'Secrets of the Whales' surfaces little-known facts

When a killer whale slowly circled back toward wildlife photographer Brian Skerry in the middle of the ocean after discarding the giant sting ray it was devouring, panic is not what came to mind: "Part of my brain is thinking, ...

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Whale

Whales are marine mammals of order Cetacea which are neither dolphins—members, in other words, of the families Delphinidae or Platanistoidae—nor porpoises. They include the blue whale, the largest living animal. Orcas, colloquially referred to as "killer whales", and pilot whales have whale in their name but for the purpose of biological classification they are actually dolphins. For centuries whales have been hunted for meat and as a source of valuable raw materials. By the middle of the 20th century, large-scale industrial whaling had left many species seriously endangered.

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