Related topics: new zealand · marine mammal · ocean · climate change · fossil

Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves—warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems—and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new ...

A 'pivotal' moment for understanding whale evolution

Scientists could soon better investigate the feeding behaviors of extinct dolphin and whale species. A third year student at Japan's Nagoya University has found that the range of motion offered by the joint between the head ...

Study finds whales use stealth to feed on fish

Small fish are speedy and easy to scare. So how is it that a giant humpback whale, attacking at speeds about as fast as a person jogs, is able to eat enough fish to sustain itself? Combining field studies, laboratory experiments ...

Scientists study manta rays' impressive ability to heal

"Whoopi' the manta ray—a regular visitor to Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef—has helped University of Queensland and Murdoch University scientists study rays' impressive ability to heal.

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Whale

Whales are marine mammals of order Cetacea which are neither dolphins—members, in other words, of the families Delphinidae or Platanistoidae—nor porpoises. They include the blue whale, the largest living animal. Orcas, colloquially referred to as "killer whales", and pilot whales have whale in their name but for the purpose of biological classification they are actually dolphins. For centuries whales have been hunted for meat and as a source of valuable raw materials. By the middle of the 20th century, large-scale industrial whaling had left many species seriously endangered.

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