Related topics: body mass index · obesity · weight loss · women · weight gain

Could breadfruit be the next superfood?

A fruit used for centuries in countries around the world is getting the nutritional thumbs-up from a team of British Columbia researchers.

Manmade mass now outweighs life on Earth: study

For the first time in history manmade materials now likely outweigh all life on Earth, scientists said Wednesday in research detailing the "crossover point" at which humanity's footprint is heavier than that of the natural ...

Researchers identify calorie-burning pathway in fat cells

Investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in collaboration with scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have identified a natural molecular pathway that enables cells to burn off calories as heat rather ...

Corning VP says Gorilla Glass headed for automobiles

(Phys.org) —Corning Senior Vice President, Jeffrey Evenson told audience members at this year's MIT Technology Review's Mobile Summit, that its Gorilla Glass will very soon be used in automobiles. Currently, Gorilla Glass ...

Prehistoric killing machine exposed

Previously thought of as heavy, slow and sluggish, the 260-million-year-old predator, Anteosaurus, was a ferocious hunter-killer.

Lily the barn owl reveals how birds fly in gusty winds

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College have discovered how birds are able to fly in gusty conditions—findings that could inform the development of bio-inspired small-scale aircraft.

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Weight

In the physical sciences, the weight of an object is the magnitude, W, of the force that must be applied to an object in order to support it (i.e. hold it at rest) in a gravitational field. The weight of an object equals the magnitude of the gravitational force acting on the object, less the effect of its buoyancy in any fluid in which it might be immersed. Near the surface of the Earth, the acceleration due to gravity is approximately constant; this means that an object's weight near the surface of the Earth is roughly proportional to its mass.

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