Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection

Water fleas, or Daphnia, ensure their survival by reacting to a signal substance of their predators (fish) with flight. The zoologist Meike Anika Hahn from Professor Dr. Eric von Elert's research group at the University of ...

Salamanders chew with their palate

The Italian Crested Newt – Triturus carnifex – eats anything and everything it can overpower. Earthworms, mosquito larvae and water fleas are on its menu, but also snails, small fish and even its own offspring. A research ...

Scientists reveal how water fleas settled during the Ice Age

A new study shows that the roots used by three close species of microscopic Daphnia crustaceans to settle across the territory of Northern Eurasia differed greatly. The findings shed light on how continental freshwater fauna ...

A method for predicting the impact of global warming on disease

Scientists have devised a method for predicting how rising global temperatures are likely to affect the severity of diseases mediated by parasites. Their method can be applied widely to different host-pathogen combinations ...

These rapidly reproducing critters offer evolutionary insights

It may not be obvious on casual glance, but bugs – flies, beetles, roaches – are constantly changing. In fact, they are masters of adaptation, always modifying their genes to adapt to the changes that occur to the environments ...

Scientists watch water fleas take over new territory

Look into any nutrient-rich pond almost anywhere in the world and you will find Daphnia pulex, a tiny crustacean (also called a water flea) that is a source of food for fish and fascination for scientists. A new study, reported ...

Invasive waterflea can change ecosystems in the Bothnian Bay

The highly bioinvasive water flea, Cercopagis pengoi, has spread from the Caspian Sea to greater parts of the Baltic Sea. In the Bothnian Bay, it seems to meet a barrier in the area between the Bothnian Sea and the Bothnian ...

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